Teaching working class

Front Cover
University of Massachusetts Press, 1999 - Education - 320 pages
Since the 1970s, working-class individuals have made up an increasing proportion of students enrolled in institutions of higher education. At the same time, working-class studies has emerged as a new academic discipline, updating a long tradition of scholarship on labor history and proletarian literature to include discussions of working-class culture, intersections of class with race and ethnicity, and studies of the representation of the working class in popular culture. These developments have generated new ideas about teaching that incorporate both a sensitivity to the working-class roots of many students and the inclusion of course content informed by an awareness of class culture.

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Contents

TEACHING WORKINGCLASS LITERATURE
10
WRITING THE PERSONAL
15
BORDER CROSSINGS
28
Copyright

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