Tears of the Desert: One woman's true story of surviving the horrors of Darfur

Front Cover
Hodder & Stoughton, Aug 30, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 384 pages
Halima Bashir was born into the remote western deserts of Sudan. She grew up in a wonderfully rich environment and later went on to study medicine. At the age of twenty-four she returned to her tribe and began practising as their first ever qualified doctor. But then a dark cloud descended upon her people... Janjaweed Arab militias began savagely assaulting her people. At first, Halima tried not to get involved. But in January 2004 they attacked people in her village. Halima treated the traumatised victims and was sickened by what she saw. She decided to speak out in a Sudanese newspaper and to the UN charities. Then the secret police came for her. For days Halima was interrogated and subjected to unspeakable torture. She finally escaped but the nightmare just seemed to follow her... This inspiring story tells of one woman's determination to survive and her passion to defend her people. For the first time, we can truly understand the personal horrors of Darfur from someone who lived through it.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
17
4 stars
12
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ThoughtsofJoyLibrary - www.librarything.com

Halima grew up in a Darfur village with her mother, father, grandmother, 2 bothers and 1 sister. She shares the ups and horrific downs of her life beginning with her childhood. The customs of her ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - schatzi - LibraryThing

Halima Bashir, the product of a loving and close-knit Sudanese family, studied and worked hard and became her village's first medical doctor, much to her father's pride. But her promising career is ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2012)

Halima Bashir grew up in the remote deserts of Darfur, Sudan, in a loving family that was part of the black African Zaghawa tribe. She proved herself to be academically gifted and went on to be the first person in her village to qualify as a medical doctor. But then war broke out and her life sprialled into an unimaginably dark nightmare. In 2005 she finally sought asylum in the UK where she continues to speak out about the violence in Sudan. In October 2008 she won the Victor Gollancz Human Rights Prize. Halima still lives in the UK with her husband and two sons and they were all granted UK citizenship in 2008.

Bibliographic information