Technical Bulletin

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Agricultural Experiment Station., 1915 - Agriculture
 

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Page 107 - The results are given in Table IV. It can be seen from Table IV that...
Page 108 - Stripping at different seasons when accompanied by or preceded by spring pruning, had no stimulative effect on fruit bud formation. The effects of stripping were offset by those of spring pruning. Stripping at the three seasons already mentioned, in the absence of spring pruning, stimulated fruit bud formation uniformly.
Page 128 - There appeared to be some relation between the total soluble matter in the soil and productiveness, to the extent that the two soils giving a very low yield of barley showed greatly less solubility than did the others. This relation, however, was not consistent throughout. 7. The general result of this investigation shows that we are not yet in a position through laboratory methods so far devised to measure the fertility of the soil.
Page 11 - Magnesia in a soil in great excess over lime in a finely divided or soluble condition is noxious to the growth of plants. With a great excess of lime over magnesia the physiological action of the plant is hindered and it exhibits phenomena of starvation. An excess of lime counteracts the poisonous effects of magnesia, while the more favorable proportion of the two bases obviates the poor nutrition of the plant. " The best proportion of soluble lime to soluble magnesia for the germination and growth...
Page 11 - Soil analyses show that lime and magnesia are widely distributed in soils and generally in sufficient quantities for the direct needs of plants. They are not always in the best proportions to each other from a physiological standpoint, for favoring plant growth. Magnesia in a soil in great excess over lime in a finely divided or soluble condition is noxious to the growth of plants. With a great excess of lime over magnesia the physiological action of the plant is hindered and it exhibits phenomena...
Page 107 - ... case in which it would be extremely desirable to know something of the relative proportions of the several substances under consideration. Under the present circumstances they can only be surmised. These suggestions should be considered in connection with the next point. "Root pruning on April 23, at the resumption of growth in the absence of spring pruning, did not give as much stimulation to fruit-bud formation as the same treatment applied at later dates. Apparently this was too early for...
Page 11 - ... counteracts the poisonous effects of magnesia, while the more favorable proportion of the two bases obviates the poor nutrition of the plant. " The best proportion of soluble lime to soluble magnesia for the germination and growth of plants is about molecular weight 5 to 4, or actual weight 7 to 4. " In liming soils the amount of lime and magnesia should be first determined in both the soil and the material applied. In this way only can the process be intelligently carried out and the best ratio...
Page 136 - Growers who raise cucumbers for pickling purposes practice late planting; planting for this purpose during the last week in June and the first week in July and thus avoiding the ravages of the beetles during their spring feeding period.
Page 107 - ... growth and foliage development in the current and succeeding year and the trees suffered from the treatment. "Severe root pruning at the time of growth resumption in the spring (April 23), at the time the leaves were well developed (May 31), and at the beginning of fruit-bud differentiation (June 23), when accompanied by or preceded by spring pruning of the branches, produced some stimulation in fruit-bud formation. Another series of experiments showed that the spring pruning did much to off-set...
Page 94 - C were ringed in exactly the same way and at the same time as the trees in plats A, B and C of series V.

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