Technology Shocks: Origins, Managerial Responses, and Firm Performance

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 7, 2003 - Business & Economics - 264 pages
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Radical technological changes (so-called "technology shocks") frequently disrupt the competitive market structure. New entrants appear, industries need to be redefined, incumbents lose their positions or vanish completely. Fast moving industries - like the often quoted example of the semiconductor industry - have preferably been analyzed for these phenomena. But do the findings hold for industries with longer development cycles like the global machine tool industry?
Here, multivariate analysis is used to find out what management needs to focus on in order to lead companies through the technology shocks. The research for this book builds on in-depth interviews with 100 experts and decision makers from the machine tool industry involved in technology shocks and statistical analysis of detailed quantitative surveys collected from 58 companies. In several instances the results challenge classical teaching of technology management.
Adrian J. Slywotzky - US top selling business author and one of the most distinguished intellectual leaders in business - comments:
"In Technology Shocks, Heinrich Arnold develops a very useful model for analyzing technology shocks, and for focusing on those factors that will enable a company to navigate through these shocks successfully, and repeatedly. Although this work is focused on technology, its thinking has useful implications beyond technology shocks. It provides ideas that managers can use to protect their firms when they are faced with any type of discontinuity, technology-based or not".

 

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Page 255 - A Note on the Relationship Between Managerial Change Values, Innovative Intentions, and Innovative Outcomes in Food Sector Firms,
Page 253 - Christensen CM. 1995. Disruptive Technologies: Catching the Wave. Harvard Business Review 73(1): 43-53.
Page 252 - Bachmann D, Elfrink J, Vazzana G. 1996. Tracking the Progress of E-mail vs. Snail-mail. Marketing Research 8 Baker NR, Green SG, Bean AS.

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