Technology and Human Productivity: Challenges for the Future

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John W. Murphy, John T. Pardeck
Quorum Books, 1986 - Science - 236 pages
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The editors have assembled a collection of original essays offering a holistic view of how technology shapes the modern world. Consideration is given to several major issues, such as the dehumanizing effects of technology, which tends to objectify social life; the emphasis on productivity and the accumulation of material goods; and the intricacies involved in creating a responsible technology that would establish more socially sensitive principles, values, and beliefs. Technology is examined not simply as machinery, but as a procedure that can be used to define every aspect of social existence, and the book demonstrates how to bring about the changes that are necessary to remedy this alienating situation.

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Contents

The Genealogy of Technological Rationality in
3
Technology Huxley and Hope
27
Production or Productivity
39
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (1986)

JOHN J. MURPHY, former technical analyst for CNBC, is the Chief Technical Analyst for StockCharts.com and President of MurphyMorris ETF Fund. He has over thirty years of market experience and is author of several bestselling books, including Technical Analysis of the Financial Markets-which is widely regarded as the standard reference in the field. His book Intermarket Technical Analysis (Wiley) created a new branch of technical analysis emphasizing market linkages. Stocks & Commodities Magazine (October 2002) described his intermarket work as "unparalleled." His third book, The Visual Investor, also published by Wiley, applies charting principles to sector analysis. John has appeared on Bloomberg TV, CNN Moneyline, Nightly Business Report, and Wall $treet Week with Louis Rukeyser, and has been quoted in Barron's and other prominent financial publications. He received a BA in economics and an MBA from Fordham University in New York. In 1992, John was given the first award for outstanding contributions to global technical analysis by the International Federation of Technical Analysts, and is the recipient of the 2002 Market Technicians Association Annual Award.

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