Telephone Conversation

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Indiana University Press, 1992 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 247 pages
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"... Hopper's aim is to begin to reveal to us the complex world of telephone conversation, and that is what he succeeds marvellously in doing." —Discourse & Society

"A guided tour through the interior world of phone interactions, ¬Telephone Conversation is a playful, often poetic excursion into the dance-like qualities of language ¬as¬ and ¬in¬ technology." —Wayne A. Beach

"¬Telephone Conversation is an engagingly written book, peppered with snippets of telephone chat that enable readers to see the extraordinariness of ordinary talk." —Quarterly Journal of Speech

"... the first comprehensive work on telephone interaction... Written in a lucid, often poetic manner, it keeps the reader's interest to the end." —Anthropological Linguistics

Voice mail, answering machines, car phones, call-waiting, call-forwarding—it seems the telephone at times controls our lives. Here Robert Hopper eavesdrops on the sounds of telephone conversation, the most important yet least examined province of contemporary communication and an important aspect of contemporary life.

 

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Contents

Maze of Open Wires
4
Bells Sketches of the Telephone
29
The Speaking Circuit
36
OPENINGS
51
Variations from Canonical Telephone Openings
63
Circumstances Relationships Cultures
71
Extrinsic View of Context
72
Transition Relevance in Telephone Conversation
103
Interruption as a Subclass of Overlap
127
TRAJECTORIES
130
Eschers Drawing Hands
167
The Honest Answering Machine
200
Transcribing Conventions
223
References
235
Index
245
Copyright

Floor Access as Power
120

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About the author (1992)

ROBERT HOPPER is Charles Sapp Centennial Professor of Communication at the University of Texas at Austin. His books include Children Learning Language: Between You and Me and Human Message Systems.

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