Tell me, grandmother: traditions, stories, and cultures of Arapaho people

Front Cover
University Press of Colorado, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 152 pages
Tell Me, Grandmother is at once the biography of Goes-in-Lodge, a traditional Arapaho woman of the nineteenth century, and the autobiography of her descendant, Virginia Sutter, a modern Arapaho woman with a PhD in public administration. Sutter adeptly weaves her own story with that of Goes-in-Lodge -- who, in addition to being Sutter's great-grandmother, was first wife of Sharpnose, the last chief of the Northern Arapaho nation. Writing in a question-and-answer format between twentieth-century granddaughter and matriarchal ancestor, Sutter discusses four generations of home life, including details about child rearing, education, courtship, marriage, birthing, and burial. Sutter's portrait of Goes-in-Lodge is based on tribal history and interviews with tribal members. Goes-in-Lodge speaks of social and ceremonial gatherings, the Sun Dance, the sweat lodges, and the changes that took place on the Great Plains throughout her lifetime. Sutter details her own life as a child born in a teepee to a white mother and Indian father and the discrimination and injustice she faced struggling to make her way in an increasingly Euro-American world.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter Seven
77
Chapter Eight
85
Chapter Nine
93
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information