Telling Lives in Science: Essays on Scientific Biography

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Michael Shortland, Richard Yeo
Cambridge University Press, Jun 27, 1996 - Science - 295 pages
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Images of scientists and ideas about science are often communicated to the public through historic biographies of eminent scientists, yet there has been little study of the development of scientific biography. Telling Lives brings together a collection of original essays by leading historians of science, several of them biographers, which explore for the first time the nature and development of scientific biography and its importance in forming our ideas about what scientists do, how science works, and why scientific biography remains popular. Theoretical and historical studies range from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, concentrating on such icons as Michael Faraday, Charles Darwin, Humphry Davy, Florence Nightingale and Sir Joseph Banks. With its broad sweep and careful, imaginative scholarship, this volume provides a timely and challenging examination of an important aspect of the culture of science that will be of special interest to historians of science, academics and students, and the general reader interested in the popularization of science.
 

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Contents

science
45
autobiography science and the French
85
Humphry Davys life
103
scientific biography in historical dictionaries
139
public images of Michael Faraday
171
Nightingale for girls
195
Thomas Beddoes
215
the changing
243
Metabiographical reflections on Charles Darwin
267
Index
283
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