Temptation and Atonement, and Other Tales, Volume 2

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Page 124 - And Margaret my feare. That I spent, that I had : That I gave, that I have ; That I left, that I lost. AD 1579. — ' Quoth Robertas Byrks, who in this world did reign threescore years and seven, and yet lived not one.
Page 318 - This was a matter for their serious, —their very serious consideration. It was not a subject to be dealt with so lightly as some people seemed to imagine: All administrative duties, from the highest to the lowest, from the greatest to the least, were delegations from Providence to the consciences of responsible Christians. "What would be their emotions, he wished to inquire, when the howling tempests of a severe winter shook their habitations about their ears, conveying the terrible certainty that...
Page 303 - from turret to foundationstone," or rather from foundation-stone to turret, within the last ten years. Instead of pretending to the dim religious light accordant with the sacred title it arrogated to itself, it combined all orders of architecture with all varieties of style ; — being constructed in poppycoloured brick, after, the fashion of Fortnum's Temple of sugar and spice in Piccadilly, and Hampton Court Palace ; one of those' hybrid monstrosities that annually disfigure the Architectural...
Page 265 - Some signal may have passed at the same time between the master and his attendant, for I was, I admit, so nettled at his imperious mode of dismissing me, that I followed the domestic rapidly out of the room, with the expectation of being recalled ere I reached the carriage. As I traversed the vestibule I determined to demand an interview with the young man who had escorted me down. But scarcely had I stepped upon the gravel of the entrance-drive, when, turning to signify my wishes to my companion...
Page 315 - ... stationer of Wheatham who had the honour of supplying the Priory with wafers and packthread (in order, as the great man frequently observed, to afford a little patronage to " the people on his estate") ; whereas, had Dr. Monson made an express visit of communication on the subject to his wealthy parishioner, a new organ would have formed an especial and exclusive gift from the Priory ; the benefaction being duly commemorated in letters of gold upon the front of the instrument. But the Common-councilman...
Page 305 - Wheatham heaved a deep sigh on hearing that, in addition to the eye'sore of what the villagers familiarly called " the red house," it was about to be afflicted with the company of a man whom the newspapers, and his own litigious, fractious, and interfering officiousness, rendered so notorious in the annals of city legislation. For it was a sociable and tranquil district ; free from the envyings and heart-burnings too often arising in English country neighbourhoods from pretension to the favour of...
Page 314 - Cripps was fated to receive the first hint of it from the officious and facetious stationer of Wheatham who had the honour of supplying the Priory with wafers and packthread (in order, as the great man frequently observed, to afford a little patronage to " the people on his estate") ; whereas, had Dr. Monson made an express visit of communication on the subject to his wealthy parishioner, a new organ would have formed an especial and exclusive gift from the Priory ; the benefaction being duly commemorated...
Page 314 - July, so plentifully were the garners of Wheatham filled with their golden store, that it was as much as Alfred Blowpipe could do not to convert his voluntaries at matins and even-song into jigs and strathspeys; for the heart of the young organist was glad within him. The vicar [was as good as his word, and his word was excellent. Early in the month of August, an extraordinary meeting of the vestry was called ; and Mumps, the churchwarden, having contrived to whisper its purport in various directions,...
Page 252 - Without a word spoken, the old man made me a sign to follow him ; and passing through the recess, from which meanwhile the table had silently disappeared (probably by the mechanical process used at the old palace of Choisy, or that of the hermitage at St. Petersburg), I entered a third chamber, more striking, if possible, than the two former ones — halfsaloon, half-library, having on a sofa-table a single silver branch, the candles of which were concealed under a cupola of green Bohemian glass....
Page 318 - The first cost was the sole cost. Any rational being (that worthy man, for instance, Jones, the sexton, who maintained a large family without the aid of parochial relief) would be overjoyed to turn the organ of Wheatham for a sum of sixpence per hour — say five pounds per annum ; which would leave a bonus of five and forty pounds annually in favour of the parish, to say nothing of the hundred, or hundred and twenty pounds, economized in the prime cost of the instrument. This was a matter for their...

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