Temptation and atonement, and other tales, Volume 2

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Page 124 - And Margaret my feare. That I spent, that I had : That I gave, that I have ; That I left, that I lost. AD 1579. — ' Quoth Robertas Byrks, who in this world did reign threescore years and seven, and yet lived not one.
Page 318 - Wheatham for a sum of sixpence per hour — say five pounds per annum ; which would leave a bonus of five and forty pounds annually in favour of the parish, to say nothing of the hundred, or hundred and twenty pounds, economized in the prime cost of the instrument. This was a matter for their serious — their very serious — consideration. It was not a subject to be dealt with so lightly as some people seemed to imagine. All administrative duties, from the highest to the lowest, from the greatest...
Page 303 - Genteel residences," with taking titles, so apt to figure in the windows of house-agents, annexed to seductive sketches in water-colours of rural otium cum dignitate, every way worthy to figure in the Suffolk Street Gallery. Of these country-seats, — nearly as shiftful of their proprietors as seats in parliament, — the grandest was decidedly Wheatham Priory ; about as much of a priory, by the way, as the. Freemasons' Tavern ; having been built, " from turret to foundation-stone," or rather from...
Page 318 - ... Christians. What would be their emotions, he wished to inquire, when the howling tempests of a severe winter shook their habitations about their ears, conveying the terrible certainty that hundreds of their fellow-parishioners were shivering with cold — cold aggravated by misery and famine ; and they reflected that the money, which might have secured warmth and comfort to these afflicted creatures, had been squandered on the futile purpose of tickling the ears of certain persons, whose piety...
Page 271 - On that point, with your ladyship's leave, we will decide to-morrow," said he, rising to take leave, after politely declining the offered fee. " And on the morrow," cried I, in my turn, almost as much interested as Lady Anne had been herself in the first instance, to hear the conclusion of Sir Jedediah's strange adventure; "what did he suggest? and above all, what more did you learn of the extraordinary people and place with whom he had been thus singularly brought into collision?" " That secret...
Page 305 - Wheatham heaved a deep sigh on hearing that, in addition to the eyesore of what the villagers familiarly called " the red house," it was about to be afflicted with the company of a man whom the newspapers, and his own litigious, fractious, and interfering officiousness, rendered so notorious in the annals of city legislation. For it was a sociable and tranquil district; free from the envyings and heart-burnings too often arising in English country neighbourhoods from pretension to the favour of some...
Page 315 - Cripps was fated to receive the first hint of it from the officious and facetious stationer of Wheatham who had the honour of supplying the Priory with wafers and packthread (in order, as the great man frequently observed, to afford a little patronage to " the people on his estate") ; whereas, had Dr. Monson made an express visit of communication on the subject to his wealthy parishioner, a new organ would have formed an especial and exclusive gift from the Priory ; the benefaction being duly commemorated...
Page 244 - ... a sort of natural portico to a rustic gateway. My companion, giving the reins into my hand, now alighted, and rang a bell which, in the silence of that secluded place, sounded so loud and shrill, that I fancied the signal must be audible at half a mile distance, instead of requiring to be repeated again and again, ere servants appeared at the gate. One of them instantly advanced to the horse's head ; I leapt from the cabriolet. " I can scarcely say by what concatenation of ideas, but as I traversed...
Page 320 - ... an organ-grinder, by the acquisition of a self-playing organ ! — A self-playing organ ! — Such an invention had never before been heard of in that simple district ; and the vestry had some difficulty in bringing itself to understand how the united efforts of the Blowpipes, old and young, could ever be sufficiently superseded by means of wheels and levers. All Wheatham was in a state of excitement; more especially when there arrived, in process of time, from town, a...
Page 329 - ... and find himself once more at ease in his own pulpit, where his mind had never known disturbance before, the concluding semibreve of the rebellious organ had scarcely exhausted its swelling breath, when a new strain commenced — the EVENING HYMN ! Twelve verses of the evening hymn! This time the giggling of the juvenile portions of the population of Wheatham proved past all power of suppression ; and though two naughty boys, whose merriment had burst into a guffaw, were thrust out of the porch...

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