Tennessee Politics in the Jackson Era

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University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1908 - 214 pages
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Page 72 - Both the constitutionality and the expediency of the law creating this bank are well questioned by a large portion of our fellow citizens; and it must be admitted by all that it has failed in the great end of establishing a uniform and sound currency.
Page 1 - Now is the time to exterminate that monster called party spirit. By selecting characters most conspicuous for their probity, virtue, capacity, and firmness, without any regard to party, you will go far to, if not entirely, eradicate those feelings which, on former occasions, threw so many obstacles in the way of Government, and, perhaps, have the pleasure and honor of uniting a people heretofore politically divided. The Chief Magistrate of a great and powerful nation should never indulge in party...
Page 72 - To avoid these evils it appears to me that the most safe, just, and federal disposition which could be made of the surplus revenue would be its apportionment among the several States according to their ratio of representation, and should this measure not be found warranted by the Constitution that it would be expedient to propose to the States an amendment authorizing it.
Page 72 - Considered in connection with the difficulties which have heretofore attended appropriations for purposes of internal improvement, and with those which this experience tells us will certainly arise whenever power over such subjects may be exercised by the general government, it is hoped that it may lead to the adoption of some plan which will reconcile the diversified interests of the states, and strengthen the bonds which unite them.
Page 1 - Every thing depends on the selection of your ministry. In every selection, party and party feelings should be avoided. Now is the time to exterminate that monster called party spirit. By selecting characters most conspicuous for their probity, virtue, capacity, and firmness, without any regard to party, you will go far to, if not entirely, eradicate those feelings which, on former occasions, threw so many obstacles in...
Page 17 - All lands liable to taxation in this State held by deed, grant, or entry, shall be taxed equal and uniform, in such manner that no one hundred acres shall be taxed higher than another, except town lots, which shall not be taxed higher than two hundred acres of land each. No freeman shall be taxed higher than one hundred acres, and no slave higher than two hundred acres on each poll.
Page 72 - Let us then endeavor to attain this benefit in a mode which will be satisfactory to all. That- hitherto adopted, has, by many of our fellow-citizens, been deprecated as an infraction of the constitution ; while by others it has been viewed as inexpedient. All feel that it has .been employed at the expense of harmony in the legislative councils.
Page 14 - I had ever been governed, neither to seek after or decline office, the appointment conferred was accepted. Aware of the practice which had long prevailed, of selecting from each extreme of the state, a person for the high and responsible situation of senator, I felt regret at being brought forward to disturb a system which had so...
Page 77 - Ohio river. The people of the two great valleys would, in summer, meet in the intervening mountain region of North Carolina and Tennessee, one of the most delightful climates in the United States; exchange their opinions, compare their sentiments, and blend their feelings — the north and the south would, in fact, shake hands with each other, yield up their social and political hostility, pledge themselves to common national interests, and part as friends and brethren.
Page 38 - In many parts of our country the great work of internal improvements is advancing with astonishing rapidity. The New York canal is in successful operation. The Pennsylvania Canal, 400 miles long, is nearly finished. The Baltimore Railroad, the Chesapeake Canal, the canal uniting the waters of Lake Erie with those of the river Ohio, and numerous other improvements of less magnitude, but of great value to the internal trade of the country, are in a state of vigorous progression, and will in a few years...

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