Terms of Engagement: New Ways of Leading and Changing Organizations

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Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2010 - Business & Economics - 228 pages
NEW EDITION, REVISED AND UPDATED

Building engagement is crucial for every organization. But the traditional top-down coercive change management paradigm—in which leaders “light a fire” under employees—actually discourages engagement.

Richard Axelrod offers a better way. After debunking six common change management myths, he offers a proven, practical strategy for getting everyone—not just select committees or working groups—enthusiastically committed to organizational transformation. This revised edition features new interviews—everyone from the vice president of global citizenship at Cirque du Soleil to a Best Buy clerk—and new neuroscience findings that support Axelrod's model. It also shows how you can foster engagement through everyday conversations, staff meetings, and work design.
 

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Contents

FOREWORDThe Means of Engagement
PREFACE
INTRODUCTIONEngagement Makes a Difference
CHAPTER 1Why Change Management Needs Changing
CHAPTER 2Engagement Is the New Change Management
CHAPTER 3Six Change Management Myths
CHAPTER 4Lead with an Engagement Edge
CHAPTER 5Leadership Conversations That Foster Engagement
CHAPTER 10When Engagement DisengagesSOME WORDS OF CAUTION BEFORE YOU BEGIN
CHAPTER 11Design Work with Engagement Built In
CHAPTER 12How to Start Where You Are
Chapter Reviews
RESOURCES
WORKS CITED
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INDEX

CHAPTER 6Widen the Circle of Involvement
CHAPTER 7Connect People to Each Other
CHAPTER 8Create Communities for Action
CHAPTER 9Promote Fairness
ABOUT THE AXLEROD GROUP
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
You Dont Have to Do It Alone
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Richard (Dick) Axelrod is a founder of and principal in The Axelrod Group, Inc. – a consulting firm focusing on employee-involvement to affect large-scale organizational change. Before forming The Axelrod Group, Dick was an organization development manager for General Foods, which was the first company in America to use self-directed work teams (a strategy whose philosophy made a great impact on the young manager). He now brings twenty-five years of consulting and teaching experience to his work, with clients including Boeing, Coca-Cola, Corning, First Union, Ford, Harley-Davidson, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Kraft, and 3M.

Foreword author Peter Block is an organizational development guru and author of many successful books including Flawless Consulting and Community.

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