Test-Driven Development: A J2EE Example

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Apress, Nov 19, 2004 - Computers - 296 pages

While basic techniques of test-driven development are simple to understand, real-world application requires knowledge of tools and techniques to effectively create, run and organize tests. This book bridges the gap between simple concepts and complex application. Ideal for Java developers, this book explains how to use test-driven development to improve J2EE construction.

Not version-specific, this unprecedented book explains development tools and methodologies in conjunction with real-world cases and examples. It includes the use of open source unit testing frameworks such as JUnit and its extensions. The authors include complete stages: test coverage strategies, test organization, TDD incorporation, and automation. Two appendices are also included, for test planning and reference.

Table of Contents Introduction to Test-Driven Development Getting Started Unit Testing: The Foundation of Test-Driven Development Test-Driven Development for Servlets and JSPs Developing User Interfaces Using Test-Driven Development Putting the Application Together Improving the Process Transitioning to Test-Driven Development
 

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Contents

Introduction to TestDriven Development
1
Getting Started
11
The Foundation of TestDriven Development
27
TestDriven Development for Servlets and JSPs
55
Developing User Interfaces Using TestDriven Development
85
Putting the Application Together
125
Improving the Process
167
Transitioning to TestDriven Development
183
Guide to Getting and Using the Source Code for This Book
191
Answers to HandsOn Exercises
195
References
265
Index
267
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Thomas Hammell is a senior developer with Hewlett-Packard and part of the Open Call Business Unit, which develops telecom networks infrastruture software. Hammell has over 18 years of experience developing software. He has published numerous articles on Java topics, ranging from Swing development to unit testing. Hammell also lectures frequently on Java topics. He holds a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and a master's degree in computer science from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Russell Gold is a senior developer with Oracle Corporation, and he currently works on OC4J, Oracle's J2EE-compliant application server. Gold has developed software for over 24 years. He authors and maintains the popular open source project, HttpUnit, a library for interacting with and testing web applications from Java programs.

Tom Snyder is a senior developer with Oracle Corporation and works on Oracle's J2EE application server. Snyder has over 10 years of experience developing software in the telecom, insurance, and application server areas. He holds a bachelor's degree in computer and information sciences from Temple University in Philadelphia.

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