Texas Snakes: Identification, Distribution, and Natural History

Front Cover
University of Texas Press, Jan 1, 2010 - Nature
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From the legendary, fear-inspiring Western Diamondback rattlesnake to the tiny, harmless Plains blind snake, Texas has a greater diversity of snake species than any other state in the country. Recognizing the public's need for a complete guide to identifying and understanding Texas' snakes, two of the state's most respected herpetologists have joined forces to create this definitive reference to all 109 species and sub-species of Texas snakes.

Well-written species accounts describe each snake's appearance, lookalikes, size, habitat, behavior, feeding, and reproduction. The authors also include color photos and finely detailed line drawings to aid field identification, along with accurate range maps, a checklist of Texas snakes, a key to the species, and a brief discussion of classification and taxonomy. The authors round out this volume with essays on snake myths and misinformation, snakebite and its prevention, conservation, Texas biotic provinces, and a brief history of Texas herpetology.

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
2
V
3
VI
6
VII
8
VIII
13
IX
17
X
21
LXVII
201
LXVIII
203
LXIX
205
LXX
207
LXXI
209
LXXII
217
LXXIII
220
LXXIV
222

XI
25
XII
39
XIII
45
XIV
47
XV
51
XVI
53
XVII
57
XVIII
59
XIX
61
XX
63
XXI
64
XXII
67
XXIII
69
XXIV
73
XXV
74
XXVI
76
XXVII
78
XXVIII
84
XXIX
86
XXX
88
XXXI
90
XXXII
94
XXXIII
96
XXXIV
98
XXXV
102
XXXVI
104
XXXVII
107
XXXVIII
111
XXXIX
113
XL
116
XLI
122
XLII
125
XLIII
127
XLIV
129
XLV
131
XLVI
137
XLVII
139
XLVIII
144
XLIX
148
L
152
LI
154
LII
159
LIII
162
LIV
164
LV
167
LVI
168
LVII
171
LVIII
174
LIX
177
LX
179
LXI
184
LXII
187
LXIII
188
LXIV
192
LXV
194
LXVI
197
LXXV
229
LXXVI
231
LXXVII
236
LXXVIII
239
LXXIX
244
LXXX
246
LXXXI
249
LXXXII
252
LXXXIII
254
LXXXIV
256
LXXXV
260
LXXXVI
261
LXXXVII
263
LXXXVIII
267
LXXXIX
270
XC
272
XCI
275
XCII
278
XCIII
280
XCIV
282
XCV
287
XCVI
289
XCVII
293
XCVIII
297
XCIX
298
C
301
CI
304
CII
307
CIII
314
CIV
316
CV
320
CVI
323
CVII
326
CVIII
329
CIX
333
CX
335
CXI
343
CXII
345
CXIII
350
CXIV
353
CXV
356
CXVI
365
CXVII
378
CXVIII
382
CXIX
386
CXX
389
CXXI
393
CXXII
396
CXXIII
402
CXXIV
404
CXXV
409
CXXVI
413
CXXVII
417
CXXVIII
431
CXXIX
435
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Page 8 - ecologic associations that differ, at least in proportional area covered, from the associations of adjacent provinces. In general, biotic provinces are characterized by peculiarities of vegetation type, ecological climax, flora, fauna, climate, physiography, and soil.
Page 8 - characterized by peculiarities of vegetation type, ecological climax, flora, fauna, climate, physiography, and soil.
Page vi - We are touched with sadness at the plight of vanishing species but much more readily brought to tears by the difficulties of ET, Dumbo, or
Page 8 - Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, publishers of Journal of Herpetology and Herpetological Review.
Page xi - they do, how they do it, when they do it, and why.
Page xiii - are listed in the reference section at the back of the book
Page 8 - a considerable and continuous geographic area. . . characterized by the occurrence of one or more

References to this book

About the author (2010)

John E. Werler retired in 1992 from the Houston Zoological Gardens, where he served for thirty-six years, first as general curator and later as general manager.

James R. Dixon is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University.

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