Therese Raquin

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Nick Hern Books, 2006 - Drama - 74 pages
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Sifted by an oppressive mother-in-law and a sickly husband, Therese Raquin falls passionately for another man. Their feverish affair drives the lovers to an act of terrible desperation, which catapults them headlong into a world more claustrophobic than the one they sought to destroy. This psychological thriller, adapted for the stage by Zola himself from his notorious novel, published in 1867, was staged in 2006 at the National Theatre, London, in a version by Nicholas Wright.

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I'm only eleven and I already love his books and plays just by reading what the they are about.

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About the author (2006)

Zola was the spokesperson for the naturalist novel in France and the leader of a school that championed the infusion of literature with new scientific theories of human development drawn from Charles Darwin (see Vol. 5) and various social philosophers. The theoretical claims for such an approach, which are considered simplistic today, were outlined by Zola in his Le Roman Experimental (The Experimental Novel, 1880). He was the author of the series of 20 novels called The Rougon-Macquart, in which he attempted to trace scientifically the effects of heredity through five generations of the Rougon and Macquart families. Three of the outstanding volumes are L'Assommoir (1877), a study of alcoholism and the working class; Nana (1880), a story of a prostitute who is a femme fatale; and Germinal (1885), a study of a strike at a coal mine. All gave scope to Zola's gift for portraying crowds in turmoil. Today Zola's novels have been appreciated by critics for their epic scope and their visionary and mythical qualities. He continues to be immensely popular with French readers. His newspaper article "J'Accuse," written in defense of Alfred Dreyfus, launched Zola into the public limelight and made him the political conscience of his country.

Nicholas Wright, an associate director of the Royal National Theatre, is an actor & playwright & author of the celebrated play "Mrs. Klein". He lives in London.

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