That's the Joint!: The Hip-hop Studies Reader

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2004 - Music - 628 pages

That's the Joint: The Hip-Hop Studies Reader brings together the best-known and most influential writings on rap and hip-hop from its beginnings to today. Spanning nearly 25 years of scholarship, criticism, and journalism, this unprecedented anthology showcases the evolution and continuing influence of one of the most creative and contested elements of global popular culture since its advent in the late 1970s.

That's the Joint presents the most important hip-hop scholarship in one comprehensive volume, addressing hip-hop as both a musical and a cultural practice. Think of it as "Hip-Hop 101."

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Politics of Graffiti
21
The History
31
Mobile DJ Starts Something
41
HipHop Culture
57
Rap Roots and Amnesia
69
Its a Family Affair
87
A Separate but Parallel Story
95
Never Trust a Big Butt and a Smile
291
Rap Politics and Resistance
307
The Challenge of Rap Music from Cultural Movement
341
Rap Race and Politics
351
Black Popular Music at the Crossroads
363
From Live Performance to Mediated Narrative
421
Sample This
437
Digital Sampling
443

On the Question of Nigga Authenticity
105
Social Scientists Construct the Ghetto
119
About a Salary or Reality?Raps Recurrent Conflict
137
The Black Music that Isnt Either
147
HipHop Culture as a
177
Race Space and Place in Rap Music
201
The New York Connection
223
Uptown Throwdown
233
HipHop Feminist
277
Tapping the Potential in HipHop
283
Challenging Conventions in the Fine Art of Rap
459
Raising Hell
481
Dance in HipHop Culture
505
Wendy Day Advocate for Rappers
517
Between the Street and the Executive Suite
525
An Interview with Carmen AshhurstWatson
541
Black Youth and the Ironies of Capitalism
557
Raps Commodification of Insubordination
579
Permissions
611
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Murray Forman is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at Northeastern University. He is author of The 'Hood Comes First: Race, Space, and Place in Hip-Hop.

Mark Anthony Neal is Associate Professor of Black Popular Culture in the Program in African and African-American Studies at Duke University. Neal is the author of What the Music Said, Soul Babies, and Songs in the Key of Black Life, all published by Routledge.

Bibliographic information