The ASTD Handbook of Training Design and Delivery

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McGraw Hill Professional, Nov 26, 1999 - Business & Economics - 640 pages
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This comprehensive companion volume to the bestselling ASTD Training and Development Handbook (Craig, ed.) helps trainers design classroom, self-study, or technology-based training programs. Delivering the latest information on how adults learn best and human performance technology, it shows trainers how to prepare lesson plans, create visual aids, and deliver highly memorable presentations.
 

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Contents

IV
3
V
28
VI
42
VII
54
VIII
76
IX
95
X
107
XI
121
XX
246
XXI
275
XXII
302
XXIII
321
XXIV
342
XXV
356
XXVI
369
XXVII
371

XII
133
XIII
147
XIV
158
XV
173
XVI
176
XVII
196
XVIII
216
XIX
237
XXVIII
396
XXIX
415
XXX
430
XXXI
453
XXXII
473
XXXIII
493
XXXIV
509
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Page xix - University; and a doctorate in human resource management from the University of Alabama. In 1987, he won the Yoder-Heneman Personnel Creative Application Award from the Society for Human Resource Management for an ROI Study of an ROI study of a gainsharing plan.
Page xix - Phillips has undergraduate degrees in electrical engineering, physics, and mathematics from Southern Polytechnic State University and Oglethorpe University, a master's degree in decision sciences from Georgia State University, and a Ph.D. in human resource management from the University of Alabama. In 1987 he won the Yoder-Heneman Personnel Creative Application Award from the Society for Human Resource Management. Phillips...
Page xix - ... more than 27 years of corporate experience in five industries (aerospace, textiles, metals, construction materials, and banking). Phillips has served as training and development manager at two Fortune 500 firms, senior HR officer at two firms, president of a regional federal savings bank, and management professor at a major state university. In 1992, Phillips founded Performance Resources Organization (PRO), an international consulting firm that provides comprehensive assessment, measurement,...
Page 227 - Follow-up sessions are appropriate for both level 3 and 4 data. • Performance monitoring is useful when various performance records and operational data are examined for improvement. This method is particularly useful for level 4 data. The important challenge in this step is to select the data collection method or methods appropriate for the setting and the specific program, within the time and budget constraints of the organization.
Page 224 - ROI process should withstand the wear and tear of implementation and obtain the results expected. Because these criteria are considered essential, an ROI process should meet the vast majority, if not all, of the criteria. The following ROI process model meets all the criteria.
Page 139 - For change to occur, four conditions are necessary: 1 . The person must have a desire to change. 2. The person must know what to do and how to do it. 3. The person must work in the right climate. 4. The person must be rewarded for changing. The training program can accomplish the first two requirements by creating a positive attitude toward the desired change and by teaching the necessary knowledge and skills.
Page 229 - External databases are sometimes available to estimate the value or cost of data items. Research, government, and industry databases can provide important information for these values. The difficulty lies in finding a specific database related to the situation.
Page 229 - For programs where employee time is saved, the participant's wages and benefits are used for the value for time. Because a variety of programs focus on improving the time required to complete projects, processes, or daily activities, the value of time becomes an important and necessary issue.
Page 136 - None of the levels should be bypassed simply to get to the level that the trainer considers the most important. The four levels are: Level 1 — Reaction Level 2 — Learning Level 3 — Behavior Level 4 — Results Level 1 — Reaction As the word reaction implies, evaluation on this level measures how those who participate in the program react to it.
Page 226 - Questionnaires can be used to capture both level 3 and 4 data. • On-the-job observation captures actual skill application and use. Observations are particularly useful in customer service training and are more effective when the observer is either invisible or transparent. Observations are appropriate for level 3 data. • Postprogram interviews are...

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About the author (1999)

George M. Piskurich (Greensboro, NC) is an experienced media specialist, trainer, and training director and analyst. He is a former national officer of the ASTD. Peter Beckschi (Philadelphia, PA) is a training manager for a Fortune 500 company. Brandon Hall, Ph.D., (Sunnyvale, CA) is a nationally recognized expert in the technology-based training industry.

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