The Advanced Montessori Method: Her Program for Educating Elementary School Children

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Schocken Books, 1989 - Education - 355 pages
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Contents

The liberty accorded the child of today is purely physical
10
How we receive the infants that come into the world
17
With man the life of the body depends on the life of
24
The precepts which govern moral education and instruction
28
Positive science makes its appearance in the schools
50
overwork nervous
56
MY CONTRIBUTION TO EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCE
67
External stimuli may be determined in quality and quantity
74
A natural internal force directs psychical formation
161
Its relation to attention
170
Persistence in effort the true foundation of will
178
Development of will depends on order and clarity of ideas
185
Liberating the child means leaving him to his own intelli
195
CHAPTER IX
241
Truth is also the basis of artistic imagination
244
Fable and religion
266

Material of development is necessary only as a starting
81
Guide to psychological observation
122
Qualities the new type of teacher must possess
128
Free movement
144
CHAPTER VI
153
The moral question
275
The education of the moral sense
331
Our insensibility
342
The religious sentiment in children
351
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Maria Montessori, an Italian educator who was the first woman doctor granted a degree in Italy, has been well known in the field of childhood education since the early 1900s. Dissatisfied with the educational methods of her time, she developed her own theories in systematic fashion. The Montessori Method, as it became known, allows each child to develop at his or her own pace through the manipulation of materials. The teacher's role is to provide the materials and then act as a supervisor and a guide. This and other concepts of hers have had considerable influence on modern education. Montessori first worked with retarded children, then classified as "untrainable," most of whom she succeeded in teaching to read and write. She established a number of Houses of Children in Italy devoted to providing new opportunities for underprivileged children. Recent U.S. efforts in this direction have led to a strong revival of interest in her work, and Montessori's methods also have been expanded to children beyond the preschool years.

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