The Adventurer, Volym 3

Framsida
S. Doig, 1793
 

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Sida 156 - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Sida 129 - If by your art, my dearest father, you have Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them : The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch, But that the sea, mounting to the welkin's cheek, Dashes the fire out.
Sida 154 - You taught me language; and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse : The red plague rid you, For learning me your language ! Pro.
Sida 17 - Fill the wide circle of the eternal year : Stern winter smiles on that auspicious clime : The fields are florid with unfading prime ; From the bleak pole no winds inclement blow, Mould the round hail, or flake the fleecy snow ; But from the breezy deep the blest inhale The fragrant murmurs of the western gale.
Sida 134 - Hast thou, which art but air, a touch, a feeling Of their afflictions, and shall not myself, One of their kind, that relish all as sharply, Passion as they, be kindlier...
Sida 183 - In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every mouth : and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations.
Sida 130 - Where the bee sucks, there suck I; In a cowslip's bell I lie: There I couch when owls do cry. On the bat's back I do fly, After summer, merrily : Merrily, merrily, shall I live now, Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
Sida 127 - To know the poet from the man of rhymes: Tis he, who gives my breast a thousand pains, Can make me feel each passion that he feigns; Enrage, compose...
Sida 65 - Paris in his twenty-first year, and affixed on the gate of the college of Navarre a kind of challenge to the learned of that...
Sida 92 - ... as are not in themselves strictly defensible: a man heated in talk, and eager of victory, takes advantage of the mistakes or ignorance of his adversary, lays hold of concessions to which he knows he has no right, and urges proofs likely to prevail on his opponent, though he knows himself that they have no force...

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