The Adventures of Oliver Twist And a Child's History of England

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Dec 1, 2005 - Fiction - 656 pages
"Oh! you really expect him to come back, do you?" inquired Mr. Grimwig. "Don't you?" asked Mr. Brownlow, smiling. The spirit of contradiction was strong in Mr. Grimwig's breast, at the moment; and it was rendered stronger by his friend's confident smile. "No," he said, smiting the table with his fist, "I do not. The boy has a new suit of clothes on his back, a set of valuable books under his arm, and a five-pound note in his pocket. He'll join his old friends the thieves, and laugh at you. If ever that boy returns to this house, sir, I'll eat my head." -from Chapter XIV In February 1837, the new British magazine Bentley's Miscellany published the first installment in a serial story written by its editor. Its star was a good-hearted orphan boy; its author was Charles Dickens; and by the time it concluded in March 1839, Oliver Twist would become one of the most beloved of Dickens' novels. First published in book form in 1838, it has never been out of print, and little wonder: it is the classic rags-to-riches story, and a foundation of modern popular fiction that is required and highly enjoyable reading for all lovers of literature. Also in this volume: Dickens' A Child's History of England, a charming survey of the story of the Sceptred Isle from the time of the Romans through the 1830s. Simply written but wide-ranging, it's a delightful read for Dickens devotees. British author CHARLES DICKENS (1812-1870) remains one of the most popular writers in the world. A spinner of stories of satire and social criticism-including Great Expectations, Nicholas Nickleby, A Tale of Two Cities, A Christmas Carol, and the work considered his greatest, David Copperfield-his writings have entertainedgenerations of readers and influenced generations of writers. ~ ~ ~
 

Contents

Wherein is shown how the Artful Dodger got into Trouble
252
The Time arrives for Nancy to redeem her Pledge to Rose
259
The Appointment kept
267
Fatal Consequences
274
The Flight of Sikes
279
Monks and Mr Brownlow at length meet Their Con
286
The Pursuit and Escape
293
Affording an Explanation of more Mysteries than one
301

Comprising further Particulars of Olivers stay at
72
Showing how very fond of Oliver Twist the merry old
80
Relates what became of Oliver Twist after he had been
85
How Oliver passed his Time in the improving Society
99
In which a notable Plan is discussed and determined
105
Wherein Oliver is delivered over to Mr William Sikes
112
The Expedition
118
Treats of a very poor Subject But is a short one
133
In which a mysterious Character appears upon the Scene
142
Atones for the unpoliteness of a former Chapter which
151
Has an Introductory Account of the Inmates of the House
163
Involves a critical Position
171
Of the happy Life Oliver began to lead with his kind
179
Contains some Introductory Particulars relative to a young
191
Containing the unsatisfactory Result of Olivers Adventure
199
In which the Reader may perceive a Contrast not
206
Containing an Account of what passed between
214
Introduces some respectable Characters with whom
221
A Strange Interview which is a Sequel to the last Chapter
232
Containing fresh Discoveries and showing that Surprises
237
An old Acquaintance of Olivers exhibiting certain marks
244
The Jews last Night alive
310
And Last
317
PAGE
325
CHAPTER X
370
CHAPTER XI
378
CHAPTER XIII
395
CHAPTER XIV
401
CHAPTER XV
410
CHAPTER XVI
420
CHAPTER XVII
432
CHAPTER XVIII
439
PAGE
520
CHAPTER XXXI
535
CHAPTER XXXII
553
CHAPTER XXXIII
565
CHAPTER XXXIV
587
CHAPTER XXXV
599
CHAPTER XXXVI
615
CHAPTER XXXVII
625
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - ... a parish child — the orphan of a workhouse — the humble, half-starved drudge — to be cuffed and buffeted through the world — despised by all, and pitied by none.
Page 10 - It was a regular place of public entertainment for the poorer classes; a tavern where there was nothing to pay; a public breakfast, dinner, tea, and supper all the year round; a brick and mortar elysium, where it was all play and no work. 'Oho!' said the board, looking very knowing, 'we are the fellows to set this to rights; we'll stop it all, in no time.
Page 29 - ... kneel down, kneel down — kneel round her, every one of you, and mark my words ! I say she was starved to death. I never knew how bad she was, till the fever came upon her ; and then her bones were starting through the skin. There was neither fire nor candle ; she died in the dark — in the dark ! She couldn't even see her children's faces, though we heard her gasping out their names.
Page 5 - ... sickened from want and cold, or fell into the fire from neglect, or got half-smothered by accident ; in any one of which cases the miserable little being was usually summoned into another world, and there gathered to the fathers it had never known in this.

About the author (2005)

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

Bibliographic information