The African Wild Dog: Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan

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IUCN, 1997 - Nature - 166 pages
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Over the last 30 years the African wild dog population has declined dramatically. Dogs have disappeared from 25 of the 39 countries where they were previously found, and only 6 populations are believed to number more than 100. Today it is believed that only between 3,000-5,500 dogs remain in 600-1,000 packs with most to be found in eastern and southern Africa. The dramatic reduction in their population is attributed to a number of factors including human population growth and activities, deterioration of habitat, and contact with domestic dogs and their diseases. This Action Plan explores some of the reasons behind their disappearance and provides a number of proposed solutions split into 3 priority areas, ranging from habitat management and conservation to monitoring domestic dogs.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Genetic Perspectives on Wild
7
Distribution
25
Distribution of Wild Dogs in Southern Africa
39
Swaziland
49
Past and Future Causes of Wild Dogs
58
General Patterns
73
Measures for the Conservation and Management
88
Information
112
Possibilities for Disease Control in Reservoir
116
The Conservation Implications
124
Some Techniques for Studying Wild
139
Appendix 3 List of Contributors
147
References
159
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About the author (1997)

Rosie Woodroffe is Assistant Professor of Conservation Biology at the University of California, Davis.

Ginsberg is the Director of the Asia Program at the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York.

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