The African Religions of Brazil: Toward a Sociology of the Interpenetration of Civilizations

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JHU Press, May 4, 2007 - Nature - 494 pages
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Written by one of France's most brilliant and creative anthropologists, The African Religions of Brazil is regarded as a classic in Afro-American studies. First published in France in 1960, the book represents a singular effort to develop a theory of the interpenetrations of African, European, Christian, and non-Christian cultures in Brazil from colonial times to the present. Addressing a remarkable range of topics—from mysticism and syncretism to the problems of collective memory, from the history of slavery in Brazil to world-wide race relations—the work is shaped by the author's rich and original conceptual framework. The result is a compelling study of the origins and growth of a native religious environment.

The English translation is supplemented with a biographical foreword by Richard Price and a thematic introduction by Brazilian sociologist Duglas T. Monteiro.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Dual Heritage
29
The Importation of Portugal and Africa to America
31
New Social Frameworks for AfroBrazilian Religions
58
Slave Protest and Religion
78
The Religious Element in Racial Conflict
97
Two Catholicisms
109
Survivals of African Religion
126
A Sociological Study of the AfroBrazilian Religions
171
Geography and the AfroBrazilian Religions
173
How the African Religious Sects Function
220
Problems of the Collective Memory
240
Problems of Religious Syncretism
260
Two Types of Disintegration
285
The Birth of a Religion
304
Assimilation or Reinterpretation?
343

Black Islam in Brazil
143
Religions Ethnic Groups and Social Classes
155
Conclusions
375
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About the author (2007)

At the time of his death in 1974, Roger Bastide was a professor in the Faculté de Lettres et Sciences Humaines at the Sorbonne. Of a rich scholarly legacy of some thirty books and well over three hundred articles, his acknowledged masterwork is The African Religions of Brazil.

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