The Ale Boy's Feast: A Novel

Front Cover
Doubleday Religious Publishing Group, 2011 - Fiction - 383 pages
16 Reviews
Book 4 of the Auralia Thread series

The king is missing.
His people are trapped as the woods turn deadly.
Underground, the boy called Rescue has found an escape.

Hopes are failing across The Expanse. The forests, once beautiful, are now haunted and bloodthirsty. House Abascar's persecuted people risk their lives to journey through those predatory trees. They seek a mythic city - Abascar's last, best hope for refuge - where they might find the source of Auralia's colors.
 
They journey without their king. During a calamitous attempt to rescue some of his subjects from slavery, Cal-raven vanished.

But his helper, the ale boy, falling through a crack in the earth, has discovered a slender thread of hope in the dark. He will dare to lead a desperate company up the secret river.

Meanwhile, with a dragon's help, the wandering mage Scharr ben Fray is uncovering history's biggest lie - a deception that only a miracle can repair.

Time is running out for all those entangled in The Auralia Thread. But hope and miracles flicker wherever Auralia's colors are found.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lyrrael - LibraryThing

This is definitely not a stand-alone book; you may want to go back through and re-read previous books before you dig in again. I'll admit I never did finish this book; it came across as disjointed and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mudrash - LibraryThing

So ends one of the best fantasy series I have read. I have read all of Jeffrey Overstreet's "The Auralia Thread" and it has been a wonderful adventure. This book does an excellent job of bringing the ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Jeffrey Overstreet is the author of three previous books in The Auralia Thread fantasy series. Publisher's Weekly called Auralia's Colors a story "precise and beautiful... masterfully told," and it was a dual finalist for a Christy Award. An award-winning film reviewer, he has written a moviegoer's memoir, Through a Screen Darkly, and contributes regularly to Image and other journals. He lives in Shoreline, Washington and works at Seattle Pacific University.

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