The Aleph

Front Cover
Full of philosophical puzzles and supernatural surprises, these stories contain some of Borges s most fully realized human characters. With uncanny insight he takes us inside the minds of an unrepentant Nazi, an imprisoned Mayan priest, fanatical Christian theologians, a woman plotting vengeance on her father s killer, and a man awaiting his assassin in a Buenos Aires guest house. This volume also contains the hauntingly brief vignettes about literary imagination and personal identity collected in "The Maker," which Borges wrote as failing eyesight and public fame began to undermine his sense of self.
For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators."

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pingdjip - LibraryThing

Used to be put off by the rationalism of these stories but like them better and better: the labyrinths and mirrors, the intermingling of history and fiction, the carefully constructed traps that characters walk into. Favorite one: Averroes' search. Second: The theologians. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

This was a very disappointing collection of short stories from Argentinian author Jorge Luis Borges; the stories are in general maddeningly brief and poorly developed. In writing a story it’s as if ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2000)

Jorges Luis Borgeswas born in Buenos Aires in 1899 and educated in Europe. One of the most widely acclaimed writers of our time, he published many collections of poems, essays and short stories, before his death in Geneva in June 1986.In 1961 Borges shared the International Publishers' Prize with Samuel Beckett. The Ingram Merrill Foundation granted him its Annual Literary Award in 1966 for his "outstanding contribution to literature." In 1971 Columbia University awarded him the first of many degrees of Doctor of Letters, honoris causa that he was to receive from the English-speaking world. In 1971 he received the fifth biennial Jerusalem Prize and in 1973 was given the Alfonso Reyes Prize, one of Mexico's most prestigious cultural awards. In 1980 he shared the Cervantes Prize (the Spanish world's highest literary accolade) with Gerardo Diego. Borges was Director of the Argentine National Library from 1955 until 1973. In a tribute to Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa wrote: "His is a world of clear, pure, and at the same time unusual ideas...expressed in words of great directness and restraint. [He] was a superb storyteller. One reads most of Borges' tales with the hypnotic interest usually reserved for reading detective fiction..."
Andrew Hurley is a translator of numerous works of literature, criticism, history, and memoir. He is professor emeritus at the University of Puerto Rico.

Bibliographic information