The Amateur Garden

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Read Books, 2008 - Gardening - 276 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 Excerpt: ...earth. r' = radius of moon, or other body. P = moon's horizontal parallax = earth's angular semidiameter as seen from the moon. f = moon's angular semidiameter. Now = P (in circular measure), r'-r = r (in circular measure);.'. r: r':: P: P', or (radius of earth): (radios of moon):: (moon's parallax): (moon's semidiameter). Examples. 1. Taking the moon's horizontal parallax as 57', and its angular diameter as 32', find its radius in miles, assuming the earth's radius to be 4000 miles. Here moon's semidiameter = 16';.-. 4000::: 57': 16';.-. r = 400 16 = 1123 miles. 2. The sun's horizontal parallax being 8"8, and his angular diameter 32V find his diameter in miles. ' Am. 872,727 miles. 3. The synodic period of Venus being 584 days, find the angle gained in each minute of time on the earth round the sun as centre. Am. l"-54 per minute. 4. Find the angular velocity with which Venus crosses the sun's disc, assuming the distances of Venus and the earth from the sun are as 7 to 10, as given by Bode's Law. Since (fig. 50) S V: VA:: 7: 3. But Srhas a relative angular velocity round the sun of l"-54 per minute (see Example 3); therefore, the relative angular velocity of A V round A is greater than this in the ratio of 7: 3, which gives an approximate result of 3"-6 per minute, the true rate being about 4" per minute. Annual ParaUax. 95. We have already seen that no displacement of the observer due to a change of position on the earth's surface could apparently affect the direction of a fixed star. However, as the earth in its annual motion describes an orbit of about 92 million miles radius round the sun, the different positions in space from which an observer views the fixed stars from time to time throughout the year must be separated ...

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About the author (2008)

Born and raised in New Orleans, in 1844, George Cable left school at age 14 and went to work to support his mother and sisters after his father's death. After serving in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, Cable worked at a variety of jobs before beginning to write. Attracted to certain aspects of Creole life, he was anxious to record this life before it entirely disappeared. His sympathies, however, did not extend to what he considered certain moral weaknesses in Creole civilization, particularly in its treatment of African Americans. As time went on, Cable began to speak out ever more openly on racial injustices in Louisiana and in the South generally. This brought a great deal of bitter criticism from fellow southerners and ultimately resulted in his moving to Massachusetts. His most explicit fictional treatment of racial injustice is probably John March: Southerner (1894), which he set in northern Alabama rather than Louisiana to emphasize the regional aspect of the racial problem. He also gave speeches, wrote letters to editors, and published articles on the problems of African-Americans in the South. Cable is especially well known for his stories about Creole life. His most successful literary work is The Grandissimes (1880), which has been compared in power and scope to the fiction of William Faulkner. The novel is somewhat marred by obvious editorializing and some wooden characterization, but it contains powerful scenes and deals with racial injustice, a subject all but taboo in the fiction of the time. Guy A. Cardwell has argued convincingly that Cable significantly altered Mark Twain's racial views when the two men were on a lecture tour together. Cable's treatment of race foreshadowed the work of such later Southern writers as Faulkner and Robert Penn Warren. Cable died in 1925.

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