The Amateur Spy

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Alfred A. Knopf, 2007 - Fiction - 367 pages
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The Amateur Spy—Dan Fesperman’s most galvanizing thriller yet—takes us to a flashpoint of global intrigue, recasting the spy novel for the post–9/11 world: Anyone might be watching; everyone is suspect.

Burned out by years of humanitarian-aid work, Freeman and Mila Lockhart have retreated to an idyllic Greek island. But on the first night of their new life they are surprised by three intruders who seem to know everything about Freeman—including a haunting secret he has long kept from Mila. They use it to blackmail him into spying on an old Palestinian friend in Jordan. Overnight, Freeman is plunged into the maelstrom of the Middle East and is quickly in over his head.

In suburban Washington, D.C., meanwhile, a prosperous Palestinian-American couple, Abbas and Aliyah Rahim, are still grieving for their daughter, accidentally killed while vacationing abroad. Abbas, a surgeon whose patients number among the nation’s elite, blames her death on the bureaucratic machinations of overly suspicious officials. Aliyah fears he may be reeling toward fanaticism, and her efforts to avert this take her to Jordan. Like Freeman, she is soon overwhelmed by the region’s dangerous passions and complexities.

As their paths converge, Freeman and Aliyah—both desperately worried about the loved ones they left behind—must swiftly separate fact from illusion, enemy from friend. The consequences of failure could be catastrophic. . . .

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The Amateur Spy

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Foreign correspondent and novelist Fesperman has created another contender for his growing list of prize winners (e.g., The Prisoner of Guant├ƒ┬»├‚┬┐├‚┬Żnamo). Freeman Lockhart, the Arabic-speaking ... Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Dan Fesperman’s travels as a writer have taken him to thirty countries and three war zones. Lie in the Dark won the Crime Writers’ Association of Britain’s John Creasey Memorial Dagger Award for best first crime novel, The Small Boat of Great Sorrows won their Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award for best thriller, and The Prisoner of Guantßnamo won the Dashiell Hammett Award from the International Association of Crime Writers. He lives in Baltimore.

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