The Amateur of Fencing; Or, A Treatise on the Art of Sword Defence: Theoretically and Experimentally Explained Upon New Principles; Designed Chiefly for Persons who Have Only Acquired a Superficial Knowledge of the Subject

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author, sold at Egerton's Military Library, 1809 - Fencing - 228 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
33
III
63
IV
73
V
79
VI
91
VII
105
VIII
111
XII
145
XIII
156
XIV
159
XV
162
XVI
166
XVII
168
XVIII
173
XIX
180

IX
117
X
131
XI
141
XX
188
XXI
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XXII
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Page xxiii - Pyrard assures us, that the Art of Fencing " is so highly esteemed in the East Indies, that " none but princes and noblemen are allowed to " teach it. They wear a badge or cognizance on *' their right arms, called in their language essafu, " which is put on with great ceremony, like the " badges of our Orders of knighthood, by the
Page 219 - ... he may then begin THE ASSAULT; That is, he may encounter an adversary, to attack or defend as occasion presents. He is then left to his own resources entirely. The following GENERAL ADVICE, Given by a very eminent fencer and excellent teacher, cannot fail to be of use: " Do not put yourself on the position of the* guard within the reach of your adversary's thrust, especially at the time of drawing your sword.
Page 216 - ... all question, there is no single exercise which combines so many advantages as fencing. By it the muscles of every part of the body are brought into play; it expands the chest, and occasions an equal distribution of the blood and other circulating fluids through the whole system. More than one case has fallen under the author's own observation, in which affections of the lungs, and a tendency to consumption, have been entirely removed by occasional practice with the foil.
Page viii - My Lords and Gentlemen, " With the utmost respect, " Your most obedient servant, "CHARLOTTE BROOKE.
Page 225 - His Majesty never deigned to give him any answer whatever. This shows still further the necessity for controlling him. I shall take this opportunity of saying a few words on the character of the Ameer. My readers may ask what I think about the character of the Ameer. There can be no doubt that he is tyrannical and cruel ; witness the deaths of his five brothers, and the many murdered Makhrams who refused to pander to his passions, Muhammed...
Page 226 - Hence we may naturally conclude, that if a man hits another, upon an average, two to one, the inferior party must pay great attention, and practise much, to arrive to even two-thirds of the other's ability, (if both parties are of equal courage, and under the same kind of instructions). A man, therefore, cannot be called a capital fencer, that is, among the first class of amateurs, if he cannot, upon an average, hit nine to twelve with...
Page 206 - I think it must be agreed that a man who wears a sword, without knowing how to use it, runs as great a hazard, and is full as ridiculous, as a man who carries books about with him without knowing how to read.
Page 208 - ... knows very well that he is not perfect ; and that if his good disposition, together with his long practice, has brought him very forward in the art, others may know as much as he, and that therefore he is not so perfect as an unskilful person may imagine. 7th. Others will say, that if they know how to " be on guard
Page 157 - But this quickness is often confounded with precipitate and consecutive thrusts, without considering that- precipitation is either when the body moves before the hand, or when an improper motion is made ; and the consecutive thrusts, the pushing several times without interval, or when there is no occasion ; which may be done by...
Page 159 - ... has no sooner discerned an action or opening of the enemy, than all the parts which are to act, display themselves to oppose or attack him, as if they depended on the eye. To be convinced of this truth you...

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