The American

Front Cover
1st World Publishing, Jul 15, 2007 - 471 pages
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On a brilliant day in May, in the year 1868, a gentleman was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre, in the Museum of the Louvre. This commodious ottoman has since been removed, to the extreme regret of all weak-kneed lovers of the fine arts, but the gentleman in question had taken serene possession of its softest spot, and, with his head thrown back and his legs outstretched, was staring at Murillo's beautiful moon-borne Madonna in profound enjoyment of his posture. He had removed his hat, and flung down beside him a little red guide-book and an opera-glass. The day was warm; he was heated with walking, and he repeatedly passed his handkerchief over his forehead, with a somewhat wearied gesture. And yet he was evidently not a man to whom fatigue was familiar; long, lean, and muscular, he suggested the sort of vigor that is commonly known as "toughness." But his exertions on this particular day had been of an unwonted sort, and he had performed great physical feats which left him less jaded than his tranquil stroll through the Louvre. He had looked out all the pictures to which an asterisk was affixed in those formidable pages of fine print in his Badeker; his attention had been strained and his eyes dazzled, and he had sat down with an aesthetic headache.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER I
5
CHAPTER II
20
CHAPTER III
37
CHAPTER IV
62
CHAPTER V
84
CHAPTER VI
100
CHAPTER VII
119
CHAPTER VIII
138
CHAPTER XV
257
CHAPTER XVI
274
CHAPTER XVII
295
CHAPTER XVIII
320
CHAPTER XIX
337
CHAPTER XX
357
CHAPTER XXI
372
CHAPTER XXII
388

CHAPTER IX
154
CHAPTER X
165
CHAPTER XI
185
CHAPTER XII
198
CHAPTER XIII
218
CHAPTER XIV
240
CHAPTER XXIII
410
CHAPTER XXIV
421
CHAPTER XXV
441
CHAPTER XXVI
459
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About the author (2007)

Henry James was born the son of a religious philosopher in New York City in 1843. His famous works include The Portrait of a Lady, Washington Square, Daisy Miller, and The Turn of the Screw. He died in London in 1916, and is buried in the family plot in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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