The American Agriculturist, Volume 3

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Review of Beatty.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 254 - This species of establishment contributes doubly to the increase of improvement, by stimulating to enterprise and experiment, and by drawing to a common centre the results everywhere of individual skill and observation, and spreading them thence over the whole nation. Experience accordingly has shown, that they are very cheap instruments of immense national benefits.
Page 254 - Among the means which have been employed to this end none have been attended with greater success than the establishment of boards (composed of proper characters) charged with collecting and diffusing information, and enabled by premiums and small pecuniary aids to encourage and assist a spirit of discovery and improvement.
Page 59 - ... rapidly to maturity. When a plant is quite matured, and when the organs, by which it obtains food from the atmosphere, are formed, the carbonic acid of the soil is no further required.
Page 94 - DEPARTMENT, DESCRIPTIONS OF MANY VALUABLE FRUITS, AND A CALENDAR OF WORK TO BE PERFORMED EACH . MONTH IN THE YEAR. THE WHOLE ADAPTED TO THE CLIMATE OF THE UNITED STATES. In one small volume, paper. Price only Twenty-five Cents.
Page 27 - Preserve self-possession, and do not be talked out of conviction — Rise early, and be an economist of time — Maintain dignity without the appearance of pride : manner is something with everybody, and everything with some...
Page 59 - What a curious and interesting subject for contemplation ! In the remains of an extinct animal world, England is to find the means of increasing her wealth in agricultural produce, as she has already found the great support of her manufacturing industry in fossil fuel, — the preserved matter of primeval forests, — the remains of a vegetable world.
Page 254 - Chemistry, as exemplifying the Wisdom and Beneficence of God.
Page 96 - Theory and Practice of Horticulture ; or, an Attempt to explain the principal Operations of Gardening upon Physiological Grounds: Being the Second Edition of the Theory of Horticulture, much enlarged ; with 98 Woodcuts.
Page 253 - It will not be doubted, that with reference either to individual or national welfare, agriculture is of primary importance. In proportion as nations advance in population, and other circumstances of maturity, this truth becomes more apparent ; and renders the cultivation of the soil more and more an object of public patronage. Institutions for promoting it, grow up supported by the public purse : And to what object can it be dedicated with greater propriety...
Page 222 - ... lapse of a few hours, by precipitating to the bottom the impure particles, so purify it that it will be found to possess nearly all the freshness and clearness of the finest spring water.

Bibliographic information