The American Crisis

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Wildside Press, Jun 1, 2010 - Literary Collections - 172 pages
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"The American Crisis" was a series of pamphlets published from 1776 to 1783 during the American Revolution by 18th-century Enlightenment philosopher and author Thomas Paine. The first volume begins with the famous words "These are the times that try men's souls." There were sixteen pamphlets in total together often known as "The American Crisis" or simply "The Crisis." Thirteen numbered pamphlets were published between 1776-1777 with three additional pamphlets released between 1777-1783. The writings were contemporaneous with the early parts of the American Revolution, during the times that colonists needed inspiring, and were written in a language the common man could manage. They are indicative of Paine's liberal philosophies. Paine signed them with one of his many pseudonyms, "Common Sense." The writings bolstered the morale of the American colonists, appealed to the English people's consideration of the war with America, clarified the issues at stake in the war, and denounced the advocates of a negotiated peace.

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About the author (2010)

English-born Thomas Paine left behind hearth and home for adventures on the high seas at nineteen. Upon returning to shore, he became a tax officer, and it was this job that inspired him to write The Case of the Officers of Excise in 1772. Paine then immigrated to Philadelphia, and in 1776 he published Common Sense, a defense of American independence from England. After returning to Europe, Paine wrote his famous Rights of Man as a response to criticism of the French Revolution. He was subsequently labeled as an outlaw, leading him to flee to France where he joined the National Convention. However, in 1793 Paine was imprisoned, and during this time he wrote the first part of The Age of Reason, an anti-church text which would go on to be his most famous work. After his release, Paine returned to America where he passed away in 1809.

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