The American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge, Volume 16

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George Ripley, Charles Anderson Dana
 

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Page 385 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years; for learning has brought disobedience, and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both!
Page 186 - States to make and enforce contracts, to sue, be parties, and give evidence, to inherit, purchase, lease, sell, hold and convey real and personal property, and to full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of person and property as is enjoyed by white citizens, and shall be subject to like punishment, pains and penalties, and to none other, any law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom, to the contrary notwithstanding.
Page 186 - States to make and enforce contracts; to sue, be parties, and give evidence ; to inherit, purchase, lease, sell, hold, and convey real and personal property ; and to full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of person and property as is enjoyed by white citizens...
Page 175 - ... is essential to the preservation of our Republican institutions; and that the Federal Constitution, the rights of the States and the Union of the States must and shall be preserved.
Page 186 - That all persons born in the United States and not subject to any foreign power, excluding Indians not taxed, are hereby declared to be citizens of the United States...
Page 176 - That the normal condition of all the territory of the United States is that of freedom ; that as our Republican fathers, when they had abolished slavery in all our national territory, ordained that no person should be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law...
Page 171 - Provided, That as an express and fundamental condition to, the acquisition of any territory from the Republic of Mexico by the United States, by virtue of any treaty which may be negotiated between them, and to the use by the Executive of the moneys herein appropriated, neither Slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist in any part of said territory, except for crime, whereof the party shall first be duly convicted.
Page 175 - That the government of a Territory organized by an act of Congress is provisional and temporary, and during its existence all citizens of the United States have an equal right to settle with their property in the Territory, without their rights, either of person or property, being destroyed or impaired by Congressional or Territorial legislation.
Page 176 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government...
Page 174 - That the maintenance of the principles promulgated in the Declaration of Independence and embodied in the Federal Constitution...

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