The American Democrat: Or, Hints on the Social and Civic Relations of the United States of America

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H. & E. Phinney, 1838 - United States - 192 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
15
III
17
IV
27
V
35
VI
42
VII
45
VIII
49
XXIV
124
XXV
127
XXVI
128
XXVII
135
XXVIII
141
XXIX
146
XXX
151
XXXI
152

IX
58
X
59
XI
61
XII
64
XIII
66
XIV
68
XV
73
XVI
77
XVII
83
XVIII
87
XIX
94
XX
98
XXI
104
XXII
115
XXIII
117
XXXII
156
XXXIII
162
XXXIV
166
XXXV
168
XXXVI
171
XXXVII
173
XXXVIII
175
XXXIX
177
XL
179
XLI
182
XLII
184
XLIII
185
XLIV
186
XLV
190

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Page 88 - For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife ; and they two shall be one flesh. This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the church. Nevertheless, let every one of you in particular so love his wife even as himself; and the wife see that she reverence her husband.
Page 70 - The tendency of democracies is, in all things, to mediocrity, since the tastes, knowledge and principles of the majority form the tribunal of appeal. This circumstance, while it certainly serves to elevate the average qualities of a nation, renders the introduction of a high standard difficult. Thus do we find in literature, the arts, architecture and in all acquired knowledge, a tendency in America to gravitate towards the common center in this, as in other things; lending a value and estimation...
Page 95 - They are, in truth, aristocrats in principle, though assuming a contrary pretension ; the ground work of all their feelings and arguments being self. Such is not the intention of liberty, whose aim is to leave every man to be the master of his own acts ; denying hereditary honors, it is true, as unjust and unnecessary, but not denying the inevitable consequences of civilization. " The law of God is the only rule of conduct, in this, as in other matters. Each man should do as he would be done by....
Page 186 - The ability to discriminate between that which is true and that which is false, is one of the last attainments of the human mind. It is the result, commonly, of a long and extensive intercourse with mankind. But one may pass an entire life, in a half-settled and half-civilized portion of the world, and not gain as much acquaintance with general things, as is obtained by boys who dwell in regions more populous. The average proportion between numbers and surface in America, is about twelve to the square...
Page 129 - ... country, than on a compact population, covering a small surface. Discreet and observing men have questioned, whether, after excluding the notices of deaths and marriages, one half of the circumstances that are related in the newspapers of America, as facts, are true in their essential features; and, in cases connected with party politics, it may be questioned if even so large a proportion can be set down as accurate. This is a terrible picture to contemplate, for when the number of prints is...
Page 122 - They who aid their masters in the toil may be deemed ' helps,' but they who perform all the labor do not assist, or help to do the thing, but they do it themselves. A man does not usually hire his cook to help him cook his dinner, but to cook it herself. Nothing is therefore gained, while something is lost in simplicity and clearness by the substitution of new and imperfect terms, for the long established words of the language. In all cases in which the people of America...
Page 174 - ... in any of the other modifications of human institutions. In one sense, slavery may actually benefit a man, there being little doubt that the African is, in nearly all respects, better off in servitude in this country, than when living in a state of barbarism at home.
Page 96 - The whole embarrasment on this point exists in the difficulty of making men comprehend qualities they do not themselves possess. We can all perceive the difference between ourselves and our inferiors, but when it comes to a question of the difference between us and our superiors, we fail to appreciate merits of which we have no proper conceptions. In face of this obvious difficulty, there is the safe and just governing rule, already mentioned, or that of permitting every one to be the undisturbed...
Page 94 - ... things that are false, and the things which make him what he is. An eminent writer of our own time, has said in substance, that a nation is happy, in which the people, possessing the power to select their rulers, select the noble. This was the opinion of a European, who had been accustomed to see the liberal qualities in the exclusive possession of a caste, and who was not accustomed to see the people sufficiently advanced to mingle in affairs of state. Power cannot be extended to a caste, without...
Page 97 - Their principles vary ; and, to a slight degree, their deportment accordingly. The democrat, recognizing the right of all to participate in power, will be more liberal in his general sentiments, a quality of superiority in itself; but, in conceding this much to his fellow man, he will proudly maintain his own independence of vulgar domination, as indispensable to his personal habits. The same principles and manliness that would induce him to depose a royal despot, would induce him to resist a vulgar...

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