The American Journal of Psychology, Volume 7

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Karl M. Dallenbach, Madison Bentley, Edwin Garrigues Boring, Margaret Floy Washburn
University of Illinois Press, 1895 - Psychology
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Page 365 - Predestination to life is the everlasting purpose of God, whereby (before the foundations of the world were laid) he hath constantly decreed by his counsel secret to us, to deliver from curse and damnation those whom he hath chosen in Christ out of mankind, and to bring them by Christ to everlasting salvation, as vessels made to honour.
Page 365 - The condition of Man after the fall of Adam is such, that he cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith, and calling upon God. Wherefore we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
Page 321 - For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I.
Page 324 - I should appear sunk down in my sins below hell itself, far beyond the sight of every thing but the eye of sovereign grace, that can pierce even down to such a depth. And yet, it seems to me that my conviction of sin is exceedingly small and faint; it is enough to amaze me that I have no more sense of my sin.
Page 206 - Be a god and hold me With a charm! Be a man and fold me With thine arm! Teach me, only teach, Love! As I ought I will speak thy speech, Love, Think thy thought — Meet, if thou require it, Both demands, Laying flesh and spirit In thy hands.
Page 340 - In the evening I went very unwillingly to a society in Aldersgate Street, where one was reading Luther's preface to the Epistle to the Romans. About a quarter before nine, while he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed. I felt I did trust in Christ, Christ alone, for salvation; and an assurance was given me, that He had taken away my sins, even mine, and saved me from the law of sin and death.
Page 190 - THE wind flapped loose, the wind was still, Shaken out dead from tree and hill : I had walked on at the wind's will, — I sat now, for the wind was still. Between my knees my forehead was, — My lips, drawn in, said not Alas ! My hair was over in the grass, My naked ears heard the day pass.
Page 165 - At other times, when swollen to an extent ready to burst, his head and tail lifted up, he spins or twirls round on the surface of the water. He acts his part like an Indian chief when rehearsing his feats of war...
Page 341 - No further would I read; nor needed I: for instantly at the end of this sentence, by a light as it were of serenity infused into my heart, all the darkness of doubt vanished away.
Page 447 - Professor JOSEPH LE CONTE'S WORKS. EVOLUTION AND ITS RELATION TO RELIGIOUS THOUGHT. By JOSEPH LE CONTE, LL. D., Professor of Geology and Natural History in the University of California. With numer; ous Illustrations.

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