The American Lady's and Gentleman's Modern Letter Writer, Relative to Business, Duty, Love, and Marriage

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Henry F. Anners, 1847 - Etiquette - 64 pages
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Page 62 - MY DEAR SIR — We are endeavoring to get up a small excursion to visit , on the — th of this month. Will you do us the favor of making one of our number? Mrs. , and my family, send their compliments, and request me to mention that they have taken upon themselves the task of providing the " creature comforts" for that occasion, and trust that their exertions will meet with unanimons approval.
Page 48 - ... extensive scale as ourselves, provided they can rely on receiving the patronage of our connection ; in the hopes of which it is our pleasure and duty to present those gentlemen to your notice. We cannot speak too highly of the confidence we feel in their liberal mode of conducting business, and their strict attention and punctuality in their mercantile transactions ; and in the hope that they may be honored with the same countenance received by ourselves from your respectable firm, We beg to...
Page 50 - My dear ( ), No one, I believe, can be more desirous to hear of your welfare and your prosperous settlement in the marriage state than myself; I am sensible of your worth, your goodness of heart, your rectitude of principle, and your warmth of friendship.
Page 25 - Dollars, and it gives me much pleasure that I have it in my power to be able to accommodate so old and valued a friend. I therefore lose no time in forwarding you a check upon Messrs. for the above sum, in reimbursing which I beg you will suit your convenience, and thereby ( blige Your old and Very sincere friend, To Esq.
Page 25 - I admit the truth, that, pleased and flattered by such attentions, I fondly endeavored to persuade myself that attachment toward me had formed itself in your breast. Judge, then, what must have been my feelings on reading the contents of your letter, in which you propose to pay your addresses, in a manner, the object of which cannot be mistaken — that I may regard you as my acknowledged suitor, and that you have chosen me as the one most likely to contribute to your happiness in the married state.
Page 48 - Harris & Co., who will, in future, carry on the business on the same approved system and extensive scale as ourselves, provided they can rely on receiving the patronage of our connection ; in the hopes of which it is our pleasure and duty to present those gentlemen to your notice.
Page 63 - ... for that occasion, and trust that their exertions will meet with unanimous approval. Should you have no previous engagement for that day, and feel disposed to join our party, a carriage will be at your door by — o'clock on morning; and believe me to be, My dear Sir, Yours, most sincerely, To , Esq.
Page 28 - ... all others I am most desirous to keep in recollection. In contemplating this specimen of the artist's skill, I feel that it will ever recall you forcibly to my recollection, and in so doing will be a constant source of delight to my mind, and will afford me some kind of solace during your absence. I need scarcely add that I accept your gift with unspeakable delight, although, at present, I have nothing better to send you in return than a fresh assurance of my most constant attachment, which I...
Page 41 - DEAR SIR, — I take the first opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of the flattering letter with which you have favored me. You wish to know whether I am willing to enter again into the marriage state, and in event of my being so, whether I should be adverse to admitting you in the quality of a suitor. I assure you, sir, I feel flattered by the latter question, and as to the former, I can only say, that I have no dislike to...
Page 41 - ... favored me. You wish to know whether I am willing to enter again into the marriage state, and, in event of my being so, whether I should be adverse to admitting you in the quality of a suitor. I assure you, sir, I feel flattered by the latter question and as to the former, I can only say, that I have no dislike to entering again into that state. But our acquaintance is at present imperfect, and we are comparatively strangers to each other's tastes and tempers.

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