The American Republic: Its Constitution, Tendencies, and Destiny

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P. O'Shea, 1866 - Constitutional history - 439 pages
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Contents

I
xv
II
13
III
24
IV
41
V
69
VI
104
VII
136
VIII
164
IX
190
X
216
XI
242
XII
275
XIII
307
XIV
346
XV
390
Copyright

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Page 255 - ... to make rules for the government of the land and naval forces ; to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress...
Page 255 - To borrow money on the credit of the United States; To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes...
Page 255 - To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing, for limited times, to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries...
Page 266 - The Constitution, it is true, as it stood prior to the recent amendments, specifies, in terms, only a few of the personal privileges and immunities of citizens, but they are very comprehensive in their character. The states were merely prohibited from passing bills of attainder, ex post facto laws, laws impairing the obligation of contracts, and perhaps one or two more.
Page 227 - Being thus derived from the same source as the constitutions of the States, it has within each State the same authority as the constitution of the State, and is as much a constitution in the strict sense of the term, within its prescribed sphere, as the constitutions of the States are within their respective spheres; but with this obvious and essential difference, that, being a compact among the States in their highest...
Page 219 - We, the people, do ordain,' &c. " The key to the mystery," he continues, " is precisely in this appellation, United States, which is not the name of the country, for its distinctive name is America, but a name expressive of its political organization. In it there are no sovereign people without States, and no States without union, or that are not united States. The term united is not part of a proper name, but is simply an adjective qualifying States, and has its full and proper sense. Hence, while...
Page 257 - ... law and equity arising under this constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made or to be made under their authority...
Page 400 - And yet, after all, he is not far from any one of us ; it is in him that we live, and move, and have our being; thus, some of your own poets have told us, for indeed, we are his children.
Page 160 - Clark's decision to suppress it was much blamed at the time, and as things turned out this was certainly a grave error in tactics; but it is easy to be wise after the event. The fact, however, greatly hampered him both in his cross-examination of old Fleming and in his address to the jury. Now that the cat was out of the bag, public opinion ran strongly in favour of the condemned woman's story; and the demand was urgent that its truth or falsity must be determined before she was...
Page 226 - In order to understand the true character of the Constitution of the United States, the error, not uncommon, must be avoided, of viewing it through the medium, either of a consolidated Government, or of a confederated Government, whilst it is neither the one nor the other ; but a mixture of both.

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