The Ancient British Coins of Sussex

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Alex. Rivington, 1875 - Coins, British - 70 pages
 

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Page 6 - In Gaul this was especially the case, and the whole of the gold coinage of that country may be said to consist of imitations, more or less rude and degenerate, of the Macedonian stater.
Page 49 - The college, or company of artificers, and they who preside over sacred rites, or hold offices there, by the authority of King Cogidubnus, the legate of Tiberius Claudius Augustus, in Britain, dedicated this temple to Neptune and Minerva, for the welfare of the imperial family ; Pudens, the son of Pudentinus, having given the site.
Page 69 - VE in monogram, in the same way that some of the coins of Antedrigus are inscribed, and in which many Roman inscriptions are traced — notably the one at Chichester before referred to — or it may be a badly formed E for Eppillus. Considering, however, in what number the coins of Verica occur in comparison to those of his brother, it is probably safer to assign it to the former prince, especially as on one of the large vine-leaf coins in Mr. Evans's cabinet the uppermost transverse stroke of the...
Page 69 - The symbol \/ may be VE in monogram, in the same way that some of the coins of Antedrigus are inscribed, and in which many Roman inscriptions are traced — notably the one at Chichester before referred to— or it may be a badly formed E for Eppillus. Considering, however, in what number the coins of Verica occur in comparison to those of his brother, I am inclined to assign it to the former prince, especially as on one of the large vine-leaf coins in Mr. Evans's cabinet the uppermost transverse...
Page 15 - ... evident that the moneyers of Tincommius were troubled by no scruples in debasing the currency, as in the coins of this prince the copper is increased from 10 or 12 per cent, to between 30 and 40. A great improvement is seen in the analysis of a coin of Verica, but this, being a single instance, cannot be regarded as typical of the character of his money. Mr. Church says : — "NOTE 1.
Page 70 - ... cases of the coinage of Tasciovanus and Cunobelin, coins of the former bearing abbreviations of the name of Verulam, of the latter those of Camulodunum, in similar positions. PLATE VI.— FIG. 16. Evans, PL IV., fig. 1. JR 18 grains. OBV. — EPP ; an eagle to the right with wings expanded. REV. — EEX. CALLE ; an open crescent between two stars of pellets. A beaded circle round both obverse and reverse. There is no record of places of discovery of this coin, though it has been frequently engraved....
Page 12 - ... chap. xiv. evidence of ancient civilisation. Its propinquity, moreover, to the Isle of Wight, through which passed much of the exported metal for which Britain was so justly famous, favours its political importance. It is worthy of note that owing to the peculiar action of the waves on this coast, coins and other heavy objects which had been buried in land long since encroached upon by the sea, would be sorted and washed ashore, and hence it cannot be assumed that this find has originated in...
Page 37 - ... across the field ; in front a star and a rosette ; behind lanceolate figures (locks of hair) and two pellets Joined by a bar. Rev. — Disjointed horse, embossed with ring ornaments, to the left ; two radiated plates and three ornamented pellets in the field. (Weight 12 grains.) This coin is what I have called "transitional.
Page 67 - JR 20 grains. OBV. — A draped bust, apparently with a diadem and with the legend VIRI, reading inwardly ; a beaded circle encloses the design. REV. — A seated figure, winged and draped, and wearing a helmet ; holding in her right hand a palm branch, in her left a sceptre. Found on Lancing Down. PLATE VI.— FIG. 7. Evans, Page 183-184.
Page 51 - An acquaintance with the vine might probably result from the intercourse with the Romans, and the permission of the Emperor Probus for Spain, Gaul, and Britain to cultivate the vine and make wine, implies its existence and use in all three countries at that time. At any rate, the device of the vine leaf does not appear to have been borrowed from any Roman coin, but the obverse of these British examples bears a strong resemblance to that of some of the coins of Selinus.

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