The Ancient Melodies of the liturgy of the Spanish and Portuguese Jews

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Wertheimer and Company, 1857 - 62 pages
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Page 20 - that it is identical with that sung in the Temple, where, as it is known, the priestly choirs were daily wont to bless the people agreeably to the command to them in Numbers vi. 22-26. That this tradition is supported by great probability, almost amounting to direct proof, will appear from the following considerations : First, that this duty devolved exclusively on the priests, who were a numerous class, who executed it with religious awe and attention, and who, as a privilege peculiar to themselves,...
Page 20 - Temple, especially as the blessing of the people was the only art of ministration remaining to the priests after the destruction of the Sanctuary. Secondly, we find that, with slight alteration, this blessing is sung to the same melody in every Sephardic congregation. And though our brethren following the German liturgy have more than one melody for it, they seem to be of comparatively modern introduction; and one of them, said to be the most ancient, contains unmistakeable traces of this, VOL. VI....
Page 20 - ... serious consideration here, except that it undoubtedly proves that the knowledge of the origin of the melody was already long lost when this ancient Spanish book was written. And here, again, the acute remark of Dr. Sachs is applicable, that ' Fable soon occupies itself to speak where history is silent.' It is therefore highly probable that this melody belongs to a period anterior to the regular settlement of the Jews in Spain. The general adoption thereof by every congregation of the Sephardic...
Page 20 - ... comparatively modern introduction; and one of them, said to be the most ancient, contains unmistakeable traces of this, which we must consider to be the original melody. Its simplicity and the repetition of the same melody for all the words of the Blessing (fifteen in number), are circumstances which will have due weight, and will be accepted as additional and corroborative evidence for its antiquity by the musical archaeologist and critic.
Page 10 - ... back with admiration to the brilliant times of the Moslem empire in Spain, in the literary renown of which the Jews bore a distinguished part. From the end of the tenth to the end of the fifteenth centuries many poets of celebrity flourished, whose hymns still have a place in the Jewish liturgies. According to Zunz the productions of the five most popular of the Sephardic poets, whose works became a part of public worship, to the number of a thousand pieces, have been introduced into various...
Page 20 - Israelit㏄ into the various countries in which they took refuge from the persecution in the Iberian...

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