The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History, Politics, and Literature for the Year ..., Volume 68

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J. Dodsley, 1827 - History
 

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Page 198 - The consequence of letting loose the passions at present chained and confined, would be to produce a scene of desolation which no man can contemplate without horror; and I should not sleep easy on my couch, if I were conscious that I had contributed to precipitate it by a single moment. This...
Page 199 - We go to Portugal, not to rule, not to dictate, not to prescribe constitutions— but to defend and preserve the independence of an ally. We go to plant the standard of England on the wellknown heights of Lisbon. Where that standard is planted, foreign dominion shall not come.
Page 121 - MP The following resolutions were agreed to unanimously : — I. That, before any measures are taken for carrying the plan into execution, a petition be presented to His MAJESTY, praying that he would be graciously pleased to grant a CHARTER to the INSTITUTION.
Page 190 - Most Reverend Father in God. our right trusty and right entirely beloved Councillor, we greet you well : Whereas the...
Page 3 - His Majesty deeply laments the injurious effects which the late pecuniary crisis must have entailed upon many branches of the commerce and manufactures of the United Kingdom ; but his Majesty confidently believes, that the temporary check which commerce and manufactures may at this moment experience, will, under the blessing of Divine Providence, neither impair the great sources of our wealth, nor impede the growth of national prosperity.
Page 198 - It is the contemplation of this new power in any future war which excites my most anxious apprehension. It is one thing to have a giant's strength, but it would be another to use it like a giant. The consciousness of such strength is, undoubtedly, a source of confidence and security ; but in the situation in which this country stands, our business is not to seek opportunities of displaying it, but to content ourselves with letting the professors of violent and exag gerated doctrines on both sides...
Page 203 - Sir, — is the Spain of the present day the Spain of which the statesmen of the times of William and Anne were so much afraid? Is it indeed the nation whose puissance was expected to shake England from her sphere ? No, Sir, it was quite another Spain — it was the Spain, within the limits of whose empire the sun never set— it was Spain "with the Indies" that excited the jealousies and alarmed the imaginations of our ancestors.
Page 127 - for the appointment of a committee to inquire into the state of representation in Parliament, and to report to the House their observations thereon.
Page 3 - They have been framed with an anxious desire to avoid every expenditure beyond what the necessary demands for the public service may require. " His Majesty has the satisfaction of informing you, that the produce of the Revenue in the last year, has fully justified the expectations entertained at the commencement of it. " My Lords and Gentlemen, " His Majesty deeply laments the injurious effects which the late pecuniary crisis must have entailed upon many branches of the commerce and manufactures...
Page 193 - What feelings of national honor would forbid, is forbidden alike by the plain dictates of national faith. It is not at distant periods of history, and in by-gone ages only, that the traces of the union between Great Britain and Portugal are to be found. In the last compact of modern Europe, the compact which forms the basis of its present international law — I mean the treaty of Vienna of 1815, — this country, with its eyes open to the possible inconveniences of the connection, but with a memory...

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