The Antebellum Period

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - History - 401 pages

The Antebellum Era was a complex time in American culture. Young ladies had suitors call upon them, while men often settled quarrels by dueling, and mill girls worked 16-hour days to help their families make ends meet. Yet at the same time, a new America was emerging. The rapid growth of cities inspired Frederick Law Olmstead to lead the movement for public parks. Stephen Foster helped forge a catalog of American popular music; writers such as Washington Irving and Ralph Waldo Emerson raised the level of American literature; artists such as Thomas Cole and Thomas Doughty defined a new style of painting called the Hudson River School. All the while, schisms between northern and southern culture threatened to divide the nation. This volume in Greenwood's American Popular Culture Through History recounts the ways in which things old and new intersected in the decades before the Civil War.

James and Dorothy Volo are one of the more prolific author teams in reference publishing today, and with this volume they make important contributions to Greenwood's successful series on America's other history.

 

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Contents

Everyday America
3
The World of Youth
51
Popular Culture
91
Advertising
93
Architecture
107
Fashion
129
Food
157
Leisure Activities
175
Music
245
Performing Arts
275
Travel
295
Visual Arts
329
Costs in the Antebellum Period
361
Notes
363
Suggested Reading
381
Index
383

Literature
195

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

JAMES M. VOLO is a teacher, historian, and living history enthusiast. He has been an active historic reenactor for more than two decades, participating in a wide range of living history events, including television and screen performance.

DOROTHY DENNEEN VOLO is a teacher and historian. She has been an active living history reenactor for 20 years and has been involved in numerous community historical education projects.

Bibliographic information