The Anxious City: British Urbanism in the late 20th Century

Front Cover
Routledge, Mar 1, 2004 - Architecture - 296 pages
0 Reviews
In the Western world, cities have arguably never been more anxious: practical anxieties about personal safety and metaphysical anxieties about the uncertain place of the city in culture are the small change of journalism and political debate. Cities have long been regarded as problems, in need of drastic solutions. In this context, the contemporary revival of city centres is remarkable. But in a culture that largely fears the urban, how can the contemporary city be imagined? How is it supposed to be used or inhabited? What does it mean? Taking England since WWII as its principal focus, this provocative and original book considers the Western city at a critical moment in its history.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The anxious city
1
The picturesque city
25
The free city
54
The Mediterranean city
82
The city in ruins
107
The architecture of civility
129
America E14
154
The museum the city and the space of flows
179
The spectacle of pleasure
200
Staging the city
228
Notes
242
Bibliography
263
Index
275
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Richard J Williams is a lecturer in the Department of History of Art, University of Edinburgh. He studied at the universities of London and Manchester, and he previously taught at Liverpool John Moores University. His publications include After Modern Sculpture (2000) and numerous articles on the art and visual culture of the 1960s.

Bibliographic information