The Archaeology of Race: The Eugenic Ideas of Francis Galton and Flinders Petrie

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A&C Black, Mar 14, 2013 - Social Science - 208 pages
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How much was archaeology founded on prejudice? The Archaeology of Race explores the application of racial theory to interpret the past in Britain during the late Victorian and Edwardian period. It investigates how material culture from ancient Egypt and Greece was used to validate the construction of racial hierarchies. Specifically focusing on Francis Galton's ideas around inheritance and race, it explores how the Egyptologist Flinders Petrie applied these in his work in Egypt and in his political beliefs. It examines the professional networks formed by societies, such as the Anthropological Institute, and their widespread use of eugenic ideas in analysing society.

Archaeology of Race draws on archives and objects from the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology and the Galton collection at UCL. These collections are used to explore anti-Semitism, skull collecting, New Race theory and physiognomy. These collections give insight into the relationship between Galton and Petrie and place their ideas in historical context.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
All Is Race
21
2 Galton and Genius
45
3 Fitting Aesthetics
67
4 Photographing Races from Antiquity
85
5 Greek Art Greek Faces?
107
6 Peopling the Old Testament
129
7 Akhenatens Bloodline
149
8 The New Ancient Race
167
9 Flinders Petrie and Edwardian Politics
187
10 Heads
205
Afterword
223
Heads from Memphis and their Racial Types1
233
Bibliography
247
Index
269
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About the author (2013)

Debbie Challis is the Audience Development Officer at the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UK and the author of From the Harpy Tomb to the Wonders of Ephesus (Bloomsbury Academic, 2008).

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