The Architects' and Builders' Pocket-book: A Handbook for Architects, Structural Engineers, Builders and Draughtsmen

Front Cover
J. Wiley & Sons, 1915 - Architecture - 1907 pages
 

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Contents

Explanation or Notation and Symbols
122
CHAPTER II
129
composition and classification of rocks
130
Geology of Earthy Material
132
Materials Composing FoundationBeds
134
Characteristics of the Materials 6f FoundationBeds
135
S Allowable Loads on Materials of FoundationBeds
140
Unit Loads on FoundationBeds Allowed by Building Codes
142
LoadingTests
145
Topographical and Special Conditions
146
Loads Coming on the Footings
148
Assumed Loads Specified by Building Codes
151
Proportioning Supporting Areas for Equal Settlement
152
lti Determinujg the Supporitnc Areas
160
Offset Footings
163
IN The Use of Cantilevers in Foundations
165
Stresses dj Footing Courses
169
Methods of Calculating BendingStresses in WallFootings
172
Bending Moments in Footings of Columns and Piers
176
Design of the Footings
181
CHAPTER XV
184
ReinforcedConcrete Footings l?fc 25 Timber Footings for Temporary Buildings
186
General Conditions Affecting Foundations and Footings 1SS 27 WoodenPile Foundations
188
ConcretePile Foundations
196
Foundation Piers and Foundation Walls
200
Protection of Adjoining Structures
214
CHAPTER m
223
Cellar Walls and Basement Walls
228
Walls of the Superstructure m
231
Natural Cements
235
Artificial Cements 236
236
CHAPTER IV
252
RetaintngWalls 3 BreastWalls ? 4 VaultWalls jg
254
CHAPTER IX
262
STRENGTH OF BRICK STONE MASSCONCRETE
265
MALVERU A HOWE
288
CHAPTER VII
297
CHAPTER VIII
305
CHARLES P WARREN
322
CHAPTER XI
375
Strength of Pins in Trusses
423
Strength of Bolts in Wooden Trusses and Girders
429
CHAPTER XIII
440
CHAPTER XIV
448
Metal Caps and Bolsters for Wooden Columns
454
Tables of Safe Loads for CastIron Columns Examples
461
Types Forms and Connections of Steel Columns
467
Strength of Steel Columns Formulas
480
Tables of Safe Loads for Steel Columns
488
CHAPTER XVI
620
CHAPTER
652
CHAPTER XVIII
663
CHARLES P WARREN
671
Formulas for the Strength and Stiffness op Continuous Girders
678
Explanation of Tables
688
Tables Used in the Design op Plate and Box Girders
702
CHAPTER XXI
717
J Determination of Sizes of Joists Beams or Girders
724
Safe Loads for Plank Flooring
730
Tables for Maximum Spans por FloorJoists
737
Dueeminatioh ot Strength op an Existing Floor
746
Comparative Strengths of Different Types of JoisiHance6
759
Belts Stairways and ElevatorTowers
764
S SawTootii HookConstruction
772
Steel and Iron Structural Members in WarehouseConstruction
781
Connection of FloorBeams and Girders
789
Post and GirdurConnections
795
IS Partitions
801
CHAPTER XXIII
811
ColumnProtection
822
FireProof RoopConstruccton
872
1 Partitions and WallCoverings
878
Design of Spandrel Beams
975
Columns and Piers
977
Foundations and Footings
979
StairDesign
983
Diagrams and Formulas for Beams and Slabs
984
Girderless Floors
993
CHAPTER XXVI
998
Types of Steel Trusses
1025
Arched Trusses
1035
Cantilever Trusses
1043
CHAPTER XXVII
1046
Examples of the Computation of RoofLoads
1054
Determination of Stresses by Computation
1058
Examples Showing Use of Tables in StressComputations
1065
Determination of WindLoad Stresses
1109
Trusses with KneeBraces
1116
Arched Trusses
1118
Trussed Arches
1121
Arches with Solid Ribs
1132
InfluenceLlnes for Simple Beams and Trusses
1134
Design of Steel Trusses
1144
Joints of Steel Trusses
1160
Purlins and PurlinConnections
1169
I Computation of W indStresses
1176
Combination of Dead and Live Loads with WindLoads
1183
PART III
1195
Systems of Heating
1211
Indirect Radiation
1218
The Vacuum Systems op Heating
1233
Heat from Radiatlnc Surface
1240
FurnaceHeating
1251
Specifications for SteamHeating
1262
Tables for HotAir Stacks Registers SteamPiping Etc
1276
Chimneys for PowerPlants
1286
HYDRAULICS PLUMBING AND DRAINAGE
1295
Hyotaulics M5 Private WaterSupply Pumps
1304
Windmills pIKESTREAMS 1311
1311
Capacity of Tanks 318 Plumbing Definitions and Requirements 131
1334
LIGHTING AND ILLUMINATION OF BUILDINGS
1345
HEAD OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEPARTMENT WENTWORTH INSTITUTE
1351
Standard Symbols for GasPiping Plans
1359
IlluminationConstants
1365
head of applied science department went worth institute
1371
Electric Lighting Systems Commonly Iskd for Supplying the Electrical
1378
Example of Wiring
1390
Specifications for Interior W iring
1396
Coefficients of Absorption
1402
Photographing Air Disturbances
1409
WireGauges and MetalGauges
1423
Nails and Screws
1443
Data on Excavating
1450
Sand and Gravel 1407
1467
Building Papers Building Felts and Quilts
1478
WindowGlass and Glazing
1487
Memoranda on Rooking
1495
Memoranda on Tiling
1518
Data on Structural Steel
1524
Quantity System op Estimating
1555
Elevator Service in Buildings
1579
MailChutes 15g7
1597
Mechanical Refrigeration
1604
TowerClocks
1615
LightningConductors
1624
Interphones J27
1637
ChainBlocks 163
1643
Architectural Competitions
1652
Standard Documents of the American Institute of Architects
1667
Architects License Law State of Illinois 16
1686
Architectural Societies
1696
List of Valuable Books for Architects
1703
Periodicals Devoted to Architecture
1710
Glossary l3
1750

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 71 - To three times the square of the radius of its base add the square of its height; multiply this sum by the height and the product by 0.5236.
Page 10 - Multiply the divisor, thus augmented, by the last figure of the root, and subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend.
Page 47 - To compute the length of a side of a regular polygon inscribed in a given circle, when the radius of the circle is given. Rule. Multiply the radius of the circle by the number opposite the name of the polygon in column C of table.
Page 43 - A POLYGON is a portion of a plane bounded by straight lines. The straight lines are the sides of the polygon.
Page 924 - A third pat is exposed in any convenient way in an atmosphere of steam, above boiling water, in a loosely closed vessel for five hours. These...
Page 44 - Trapezoid Fig. 10. Parallelogram A parallelogram whose sides are not equal and whose angles are not right angles is called a RHOMBOID (Fig. 11); when the sides are all equal, but the angles are not right angles, it is called a RHOMBUS (Fig. 12), and when the angles are right angles, it is called a RECTANGLE (Fig. 13). A rectangle, all of whose sides are equal, is called a SQUARE (Fig. 14). Polygons, all of whose si-lcs are equal, are called REGULAR POLYGONS.
Page 68 - Add the areas of the two ends. To compute the area of the surface of a pyramid. Rule. Multiply the perimeter of the base by onehalf the slant-height and add to the product the area of the base. To compute the area of the surface of the frustum of a pyramid. Rule. Multiply the sum of the...
Page 66 - AND ALSO THE AREA OF THE TRIANGLE FORMED BY THE CHORD OF THE SEGMENT AND THE RADII OF THE SECTOR. THEN...
Page 33 - NAUTICAL MEASURE. A nautical or sea mile is the length of a minute of longitude of the earth at the equator at the level of the sea. It is assumed = 6086.07 feet = 1.152664 statute or land miles by the United Stites Coast Survey.
Page 10 - The Cube of a Number is the product obtained by multiplying the number by itself, and that product by the number again; thus, the cube of 14 = 14

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