The Architects' and Builders' Pocket-book: A Handbook for Architects, Structural Engineers, Builders and Draughtmen

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John Wiley & Sons, 1915 - Architecture - 1816 pages
 

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Contents

LoadingTests
145
topocraphical and special conditions
146
Loads Coming on the Footlngs 14 Assumed Loads Specified by Building Codes
151
Proportioning Supporting Areas for Equ AL Settlement 10 Determining the Supporting Areas 17 Offset Footings
160
The Use of Cantilevers in Foundations
165
Stresses is Footing Courses 20 Methods of Calculating BendingStresses in W allFootings 21 Bending Moments in Footings of Columns and Piers
176
Design of the Footings
178
Steel Grillages in Foundations
181
ReinforcedConcrete Footings 25 Timber Footings for Temporary Buildings
186
2U General Conditions Affecting Foundations and Footings 27 WoodenPile Foundations
188
ConcretePile Foundations
196
Foundation Piers and Foundation Walls 30 Methods of Excavating for Foundations
200
Protection of Adjoining Structures
214
CHAPTER III
223
Cellar Walls and Basement Walls
228
Walls of the Superstructure
229
Natural Cements
235
Artificial Cements
236
Concrete
245
CHAPTER IV
252
RETAININGWALLS BREASTWALLS AND VAULTWALLS
254
STRENGTH OF BRICK STONE MASSCONCRETE
265
Compressxve Strength of Mortars and Concretes
282
CHAPTER VI
288
member of american institute of architects
297
THE STABILITY OF MASONRY ARCHES
305
Mechanical Principles Involved RetainingWalls
311
CHARLES P WARREN
322
CHAPTER X
332
CHAPTER XI
375
Strength of Pins in Trusses
423
Strength of Bolts in Wooden Trusses and Girders
429
CHAPTER XIII
440
CHAPTER XIV
448
CHAPTER XXII
454
Strength of CastIron Columns Formulas
459
Types Forms and Connections of Steel Columns
467
CHAPTER XVI
620
CHAPTER XVII
652
CHAPTER XVUI
663
Continuous Girders in Grillage Foundations
678
Design of Plate and Box Girders
685
Tables Used in the Design of Plate and Box Girders
702
CHAPTER XXI
717
Determination of Sizes of Joists Beams or Girders
724
Satt Loads tor Plank Flooring
732
Determination of Strength of an Existing Floor
747
Comparative Strengths of Different Types of JoistHangers
756
WOODEN MILL AND WAREHOUSE CONSTRUCTION BY A P STRADLING MANAGER PHILADELPHIA SUBURBAN UNDERWRITERS ASS...
758
What MillConstruction Is
759
Standard MillConstruction
760
Belts Stairways and ElevatorTowers
764
tt Standard StorehouseConstruction
765
Example of OneStory Workshop
769
SawTooth RoofConstruction
775
MillConstruction as Applied to Warehouses
777
Steel and Iron Structural Members in WarehouseConstruction
780
Structural Details op MillConstruction as Applied to Factories and Warehouses
782
Connection of FloorBeams and Girders
789
WallSupports and Anchors for Joists and Girders
792
Weakness of WroughtIron Stirrups when Exposed to Fire
794
Post and GirderConnections
795
FireProof RoofConstruction
872
Partitions and WallCoverings
878
FtreProof Flooring
897
Interior Finish and Fittings
898
Protection From Outside Hazard
906
Extinguishing Devices and Precautionary Measures
908
CHAPTER XXIV
911
Materials Used in ReinforcedConcrete Construction
912
Design of ReinforcedConcrete Construction
927
TTPES Or REBfrORJCEDCoNCRETE CONSTRUCTION
951
Protection Against Corrosion in ReinforcedConcrete Construction
960
CHAPTER XXV
968
Design or Spandrel Beams
975
StateDesign
983
GrmrRT rss Floors
993
Types of Steel Trusses
1025
Ar mld Trusses
1035
Cantilever Trusses
1043
Examples or the Computation of RoofLoads
1054
Examples Showing Use of Tables k StressComputations
1065
Determination of WindLoad Stresses
1109
Trusses with KneeBraces
1116
Aiches with Solid Ribs
1132
Design of Steel Trusses
1144
Joints of Steel Trusses
1160
Purlins and PurlinConnections
1169
Computation of WindStresses
1176
Combination of Dead and Live Loads with WindLoads
1183
USEFUL INFORMATION FOR ARCHITECTS BUILDERS
1195
fxk ta Pmm
1243
taoa io FxmMACEHcAnNC
1258
_ tf HotAim Stacks Registers SteamPiping Etc
1276
m rca PowerPlants
1286
pTRAUL ICS PLUMBING AND DRAINAGE
1295
Pumps
1304
of Cylindrical Wooden Tanks
1312
Am op Tasks
1318
kb ot PlumbingSystems
1326
nattrso Specialties
1334
EATDiGGAS 1315
1346
Thee Systems op General illumination
1354
Eukpus op Design op a Lighting System
1360
SEUCnoN O? lLLUMCTANTS 13Wj
1367
General Considerations and Definitions
1371
Electric Lighting Systems Commonly Used for Supplying the Electrical
1378
woecalculations
1390
Specifications for Interior Wiring
1396
Coefficients op Absorption
1407
Specific Gravity
1414
WireGauges and MetalGauges
1423
Nails and Screws
1443
LmrnxGCosDCCTORS
1624
Four of the Wlkd
1637
CxahBlocxs
1643
AiarrrEcrcRAL CoicpETrnoNs 6o2
1667
Aickitbcts License Law State of Illinois
1685
evocation al insttttttionb
1703
PmoDtcALS Devoted to Architecture
1710
IBMB Tkkms Uses in Law
1768
BreastWalls
1777
VaultWalls
1807
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Page 4 - Multiply the divisor, thus augmented, by the last figure of the root, and subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend.
Page 384 - Material which is to be used without annealing or further treatment shall be tested in the condition in which it comes from the rolls.
Page 915 - A third pat is exposed in any convenient way in an atmosphere of steam, above boiling water, in a loosely closed vessel for five hours.
Page 914 - No. 100, and not more than 25 per cent on the No. 200 sieve. TIME OF SETTING. It shall develop initial set in not less than thirty minutes, but must develop hard set in not less than one hour, nor more than ten hours.
Page 915 - Pats of neat cement about three inches in diameter, one-half inch thick at the center, and tapering to a thin edge, shall be kept in moist air for a period of twenty-four hours.
Page 289 - The moment of a force about any point is the product of the magnitude of the force and the perpendicular distance from the point to the line of action of the force.
Page 36 - A plane is a surface, in which any two points being taken, the straight line joining those points lies wholly in that surface.
Page 28 - Measures of Weight The standard AVOIRDUPOIS POUND is the weight of 27.7015 cubic inches of distilled water weighed in air at 39.83 F., with the barometer at 30 inches.
Page 38 - A circle is a closed plane curve, all points of which are equidistant from a point within called the center.
Page 64 - To three times the square of the radius of its base add the square of its height; multiply this sum by the height and the product by 0.5236.

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