The Architectural Drawings of Antonio Da Sangallo the Younger and His Circle: Fortifications, machines, and festival architecture

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Architectural History Foundation, 1994 - Art - 532 pages
The first of three volumes of the drawings by the Italian architect Antonio da Sangallo the Younger (1484-1546) and his circle brings to light the archive of one of the most productive architectural teams in early modem Europe. These drawings (some 1,200 in all) reveal more about the planning process in this extraordinary period of architectural invention than any other source. Moreover, they demonstrate the full range of interests of the Sangallo circle, from machinery and construction technology to the ruins of ancient Rome.

Antonio da Sangallo the Younger is a key figure in the history of Italian sixteenth-century architecture. Active on the major building sites of his day, he and his workshop were involved in major church projects (St. Peter's, Rome), palaces (Palzzazo Farnese Rome), and villas (Villa Madama, Rome). They were also responsible for fortification projects (Castro, Florence, Perugia, Rome) as well as dozens of other secular and religious buildings throughout Italy. Their drawing archive is now located in the Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe of the Uffizi in Florence.

Volume II will cover churches, and Volume III will cover palaces and the antique. Foremost scholars in the field have written complete catalogue entries for each drawing.

Christoph L. Frommel is Co-director of the Bibliotheca Hertziana in Rome. Nicholas Adams is Professor of Architectural History at Vassar College.

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
9
Section 3
10

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