Architecture and Alienation: Essays in the Political Economy of Professional Education

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Transaction Publishers, Jan 1, 1994 - Architecture - 203 pages
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The debate over architecture has been raging for years & shows no signs of abatement. In these entertaining yet serious essays, Clarke traces the origin of the malaise of modern architecture to schools of architecture themselves, both in the United States & France. He is also critical of contemporary artists, & laments the fact that modern art has now lost its connection to architecture. Clarke believes that contemporary architects have alienated the public with hideous buildings & this disaffection will eventually result in the destruction of their profession. He urges renewed recognition of the interdependence of architecture & society, & of the humanities & architecture. This engagingly written work is an important cross-cultural commentary on the state of Western architecture, art & education today. Clarke is professor of Advanced Technical Studies at Southern Illinois University & author of a number of books on architecture & environmental design. Includes an introduction by David Watkin, Head of the Department of History of Art at the University of Cambridge.
 

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Contents

V
1
VI
67
VII
147
VIII
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IX
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About the author (1994)

David Clarke is professor of advanced technical studies at the College of Technical Careers, Southern Illinois University.

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