The Architecture of Roman Temples: The Republic to the Middle Empire

Voorkant
Cambridge University Press, 16 feb. 2005 - 287 pagina's
This book examines the development of Roman temple architecture from its earliest history in the sixth century BC to the reigns of Hadrian and the Antonines in the second century AD. John Stamper analyzes the temples' formal qualities, the public spaces in which they were located and, most importantly, the authority of precedent in their designs. He also traces Rome's temple architecture as it evolved over time and how it accommodated changing political and religious contexts, as well as the affects of new stylistic influences.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

The Authority of Precedent
1
Building the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus
6
A New Reconstruction of the Temple
13
EtruscoRoman Temples of the Early Republic
26
Assimilation of Hellenistic Architecture after the Punic Wars
41
The Corinthian Order in the First Century bc
47
Architecture and Ceremony in the Time of Pompey and Julius Caesar
50
Rebuilding Rome in the Tissue of Augustus
65
The FOrum Traiani
109
Hadrians Pantheon
120
Hadrian and the Antonines
124
Epilogue
125
Notes
129
List of Abbreviations
141
Words Cited and Consulted
145
Index
161

Augustus and the Temple of Mars Ultor
76
Temples and Fora of the Flavian Emperors
95

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Over de auteur (2005)

John Stamper is Associate Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame. Both an architect and architectural historian, he is the author of Chicago's North Michigan Avenue: Planning and Development, 1900-1930.

Bibliografische gegevens