De Arte Venardi Cum Avibus: Being the De Arte Venandi Cum Avibus of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen

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Stanford University Press, 1961 - Sports & Recreation - 637 pages
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De Arte Venandi cum Avibus was written shortly before the year 1250 by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily and Jerusalem, in whose court, with its remarkably cosmopolitan and highly intellectual life, may be found the real beginning of the Italian Renaissance. In spite of its title, it is far more than a dissertation on hunting. There is a lengthy introduction dealing with the anatomy of birds, an intensely interesting description of avian habits, and the excursions of migratory birds. Indeed, this ancient book has long been recognized as the first zoological treatise written in the critical spirit of modern science. The sumptuous volume now in hand is, however, the first translation into English of the complete text, originally divided into a prologue and size books. Together, the translators and editors, have at last made available this classic work and have adorned it with notes, comments, bibliographies, and glossary. They have produced a work of great value to zoologists--especially the ornithologist--and also to everyone interested in the history of science and in medieval art and letters.
 

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Contents

PAGE
xxi
TRANSLATORS INTRODUCTION
xxxv
MANUSCRIPTS AND EDITIONS OF THE DE ARTE VENANDI
lix
TACK
lxxxiv
THE CASTLES AND HUNTING LODGES OF EMPEROR FREDERICK
xcv
THE ART OF FALCONRY by Emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen
3
How Land Birds Seek Their Food and Why Owls Hunt
19
How and When They Obtain Their
22
Of the Manning of Sighted Falcons
173
Of Various Forms of Bating
175
On the Causes of Bating
178
How to Avoid Unrest and Bating in Falcons
179
On the Position of Sighted Falcons on the Perch
182
Further Remarks on the Taming of Sighted Falcons Held on the Fist
184
Of the Taming of Falcons on Foot and on Horse back
189
When the Falconer Should Carry the Falcon Back to the Mews
190

Chapter XVA Of Rapacious Birds Their Excursions and Methods
28
Of the Seasons and Weather That Favor Migration
34
Of Localities Whence Migrations Start and of Halt
40
Chapter XXIIIE Of Coitus in Birds
49
Chapter XXIIII Of the Functions of Avian Organs
56
Of the Wings of Birds
64
Of the Dorsal Region
70
Of the Oil Gland Perunctum
71
Of the Sides or Flanks of Birds
72
Of the Toes and Feet
73
Of Avian Claws and Talons
75
The Internal Organs of the Bird
76
Of the Trachea and Bronchial Tubes
78
Concerning the Stomach
79
Of the Colors of Avian Plumage
80
Of the Contour Feathers
81
Of the Down
82
Of the Wing Feathers
83
Of the Arrangement of the Flight Feathers
84
Of the Number of Tail Feathers
89
Of the Position and Form of the Tail Feathers
90
Of Modes of Flight in Birds
91
Of Avian Means of Offense and Defense
95
Of the Localities in Which Birds Seek Shelter
97
OF FALCONS USED IN HUNTING THEIR FURNITURE CARE AND MANNING
105
The Definition of a Bird of Prey and the Reason for This Designation
107
Why the Female Bird of Prey Is Larger Than the Male
108
Of the Behavior of Birds of Prey During the Nesting Season
110
Of the Localities Chosen by Raptores for Their Eyries
111
Of Hawks Accipitres
112
Of the Brooding Season
117
How and Why Falcons Expel Their Young from the Eyrie
118
Of the Season of the Year Chosen by Predatory Birds for Migration
119
Of the Gerfalcon
121
Of Peregrine Falcons
122
Of Brown Reddish and FawnColored Peregrine Falcons
124
Of Lanner Falcons
127
Of the Differences between Nestlings and Branchers
128
How to Reach the Eyrie
129
Of the Number of Meals and Hours of Feeding for Falcons
135
Of the Best Hours for Feeding Hunting Birds
136
Of the Seeling of Falcons
137
Of Jesses and How They Are Fitted
138
Of the Leash Its Preparation and Its Uses
139
Of the Swivel Its Uses and Method of Fastening
140
How to Carry a Falcon on the Hand
143
How to Catch Branchers and Other Wild Falcons
144
Of the Localities Where Falcons Are Captured
145
Of the Seeling of Falcons Caught Wild
146
Of Methods of Carrying Falcons and Holding Them on the Fist
149
Of Falconers and Their Qualifications
150
11 Of Classes of Falconers and of the Aims of the True Falconer
151
Of Training a Falcon to Stand on the Fist and of Other Steps in Manning
157
Of the Perches and Blocks on Which Falcons May Rest
160
Of the Use of Various Stools and Perches
162
I Of the Unrest and Bating of Seeled Falcons
169
Of the Training of the Seeled Falcon through the Senses of Taste Hearing and Touch
170
On the Taming of Falcons by the Gradual Restoration of Eyesight
171
On the Falcons Bath
191
On the Taming of Falcons on Horseback and of the Most Suitable Hours for This Training
193
The Falconer on Horseback and His Equipment
194
On the Transport and Surroundings of Untamed Falcons When on a Journey
195
On Transporting Falcons through Various Re gions
201
Of the Unrest and Bating of Falcons Whether on the Fist or on the Perch
202
On the Faulty Carriage of a Falcon on the Fist Its Signs and Symptoms
203
On the Training of the Falcon by Means of the Hood
205
Of the Forms Manufacture and Uses of the Falcons Hood
206
Of the Proper Place for and Manner of Hooding the Falcon
207
On Objections to the Hood on the Part of the Fal con and How to Deal with Them
208
ON THE USE OF THE LURE ON TRAINING FALCONS TO FLY IN A CAST ON EDUCATING GERFALCONS TO FLY AT CRANES AND ON ...
225
On Various Classes of Falconers Who Reprehensibly Do Not Use a Lure
227
On the Method of Luring with a Live Bird
228
The Emperors Method of Luring
229
On the Use of the Creance in Luring
230
Of How to Approach a Falcon Standing on the Lure
231
On Feeding a Falcon on the Lure and on How to Lift Her from It for Repeated Practice Flights
232
On the Choice of a Locality for the First Outdoor Trials with the Lure
237
Of the Weather and Hours Suitable for Luring and of Further Particulars Concerning the Use of the Lure
238
Of Final Instructions for Practice with the Lure before the Falcon Is Released from the Creance
239
Of Luring the Falcon on Foot without the Creance
241
How Falcons Are Lured in Britain
243
On Falcons Who Refuse to Come to the Lure
244
On Testing Falcons to Be Flown in a Cast
246
How to Teach Falcons to Cooperate When Flown in a Cast and on the Use of the HareTrain and the MakeFalcon
248
On Entering a Gerfalcon to the CraneTrain and
257
On the Value of the Train in the Education of
266
CRANE HAWKING WITH GERFALCONS AND OTHER FALCONS
273
On How the Mounted Falconer Separates Two
281
On the Posting of Assistants on an Open Plain Free
283
On the Nature of the Assistance to Be Given a Ger
289
On Entering the Gerfalcon to Fly Singly at Cranes
296
Of Shirkers and the Treatment of Their Infirmities
303
How Other Species of Falcons Compare with Ger
309
HERON HAWKING WITH SAKERS AND OTHER FALCONS
317
On the Best Season for Educating a Saker to Hunt
323
On Heron Hawking at the River
329
On the Reasons Why a Falcon May Fail to Capture
336
On Four Characteristic Modes of Flight Exhibited
342
On Special Hazards Caused by Wind and Unfavor
346
On the Special Attention to Be Given Individual
352
HAWKING AT THE BROOK WITH THE PEREGRINE FALCON
363
On Training the Peregrine to Wait On and on
369
How to Correct the Flight of Falcons Who Fly Low
379
On Various Localities Where Hawking at the Brook
385
How to Determine the Cause of the Falcons Raking
391
On Signs of Distress in a Falcon and How the Fal
398
APPENDED MATERIAL
417
FALCONRY IN MODERN TIMES by Walter Schluter
451
COINS AND MEDALS DEPICTING FALCONS AND FALCONRY from the Collection
468
NOTES ON THE ST GORGON STATUE by Gordon Washburn
473
NOTES ON THE PORTRAITS OF EMPEROR FREDERICK II AND OF His SON MANFRED
503
ANNOTATED ROSTER OF BIRDS THAT ARE MENTIONED DEPICTED
531
AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ANCIENT MEDIEVAL
559
GLOSSARY AND INDEX 611
584
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Page 605 - Poetica," p. 368. For some account of the Italian and French writers on Falconry from whom he borrowed, see Introduction to No. 81, pp. xxii.zxiii. 15. TURBERVHjE (George). THE BOOKE OF FALCONRIE OR HAWKING : For the onely delight and pleasure of all Noblemen and Gentlemen : Collected out of the best Authors as well Italians as Frenchmen, and some English practises withall concerning Falconrie.

About the author (1961)

The late Dr. Casey Wood was Honorary Collaborator on Birds in the Smithsonian Institution and founder of the Wood Library of Ornithology at McGill University.

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