The Art of Rhetoric Made Easy: Or, The Elements of Oratory Briefly Stated, and Fitted for the Practice of the Studious Youth of Great Britain and Ireland: in Two Books. The First Comprehending the Principles of that Excellent Art, Conformable To, and Supported by the Authority of the Most Accurate Orators and Rhetoricians, Both Ancient and Modern ... The Second Containing the Substance of Longinus's Celebrated Treatise On the Sublime. In Both which All Technical Terms are Fully Explained

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Page 85 - Here will I hold. If there's a Power above us, — And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works, — He must delight in virtue; And that which He delights in must be happy.
Page 88 - And when we were all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks.
Page 54 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Page 87 - And now I stand and am judged for the hope of the promise made of God unto our fathers ; unto which promise our twelve tribes, instantly serving God day and night, hope to come ; for which hope's sake, king Agrippa, I am accused of the Jews.
Page 88 - Having therefore obtained help of God, I continue unto this day, witnessing both to small and great, saying none other things than those which the prophets and Moses did say should come: that Christ should suffer, and that he should be the first that should rise from the dead, and should show light unto the people, and to the Gentiles.
Page 32 - O'er my dim eyes a darkness hung ; My ears with hollow murmurs rung. In dewy damps my limbs were chill'd ; My blood with gentle horrors thrill'd ; My feeble pulse forgot to play ; I fainted, sunk, and died away.
Page 84 - Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread and inward horror Of falling into...
Page 85 - If there's a power above us (And that there is all Nature cries aloud Through all her works). He must delight in virtue ; And that which He delights in must be happy. But when ? or where ? This world was made for Caesar — I'm weary of conjectures — this must end them.
Page 64 - The mellow bullfinch answers from the grove : Nor are the linnets, o'er the flowering furze Pour'd out profusely, silent.
Page 43 - The face of the Lord is against them that do evil, to cut off the remembrance of them from the earth.

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