The Assassination of Julius Caesar: A People's History of Ancient Rome

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The New Press, Mar 9, 2004 - History - 276 pages
Intrigue, murder, and class struggle at the heart of the Roman Empire. Most historians, both ancient and modern, have viewed the Late Republic of Rome through the eyes of its rich nobility. In The Assassination of Julius Caesar, Michael Parenti presents us with a story of popular resistance against entrenched power and wealth. As he carefully weighs the evidence concerning the murder of Caesar, Parenti sketches in the background to the crime with fascinating detail about wider Roman society. In these pages we find reflections on the democratic struggle waged by Roman commoners, religious augury as an instrument of social control, the patriarchal oppression of women, and the political use of homophobic attacks. The Assassination of Julius Caesar offers a whole new perspective on an era we thought we knew well.

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User Review  - Colby_Glass - LibraryThing

An absolutely outstanding history of late Rome. Focuses on the concerns of the common people and how deluded historians (Parenti calls them "Gentleman historians") in their prejudice for the wealthy ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Colby_Glass - LibraryThing

A "people's history," like Howard Zinn. A very different viewpoint on Caesar: a champion of the people (lower and middle classes) rather than a tyrant. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
1
13
2
27
3
45
4
59
5
85
6
113
7
131
8
149
9
167
10
187
11
205
Appendix
223
Notes
229
Index
261
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Michael Parenti is the author of sixteen books including History as Mystery, The Terrorism Trap, Democracy for the Few, Against Empire, Dirty Truths, Blackshirts and Reds, and America Besieged. His work has been translated into twelve languages. He lives in Berkeley, California.

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