The Australian Electoral System: Origins, Variations, and Consequences

Front Cover
The Australian Electoral System provides the first-ever comprehensive study of the design of Australian electoral systems. It focuses on the two electoral systems, both 'preferential', that are most closely associated with Australia: namely the alternative vote and the single transferable vote. The book covers four main themes. First, it traces the origins of Australia's electoral systems, explaining how and why Australia ended up with such a relatively unique arrangement. Second, it explores the range of variation in the detail of how the various schemes operate - variations which can have significant behavioural and electoral consequences. Third, it uses aggregate and survey data to systematically analyse the consequences of electoral system design. Fourth, it examines voter reaction to these systems, both in Australia and also cross-nationally.
 

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Contents

One Australian electoral system design
Two Australias electoral systems 190283
21
Three Australias contemporary electoral systems
47
Five The voter versus the party
102
Six Compulsory voting party control and the voter
121
Seven Preferential systems and voter satisfaction
147
Eight Preferential voting and electoral system design
166
Appendix
180
Bibliography
195
Index
207
Copyright

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Page 196 - On the whole, are you very satisfied, fairly satisfied, not very satisfied or not at all satisfied with the way democracy works (in your country)?

About the author (2006)

Environmentalist and writer Ian McAllister is the founder of the Raincoast Conservation Society, an organization that protects the islands and inlets between Vancouver Island and Alaska. He co-wrote the book "The Great Bear Rain Forest: Canada's Forgotten Coast.

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